Community

We’ve Got This: When Your Job Skills Make You Valuable in a Disaster

We’ve all had situations where quick judgment is needed, and we jump right in and everything comes together so naturally.

You’ve got this. It’s second nature to you.

That’s exactly what it was like for the people who manage Walmart’s warehouses and private truck fleet, particularly a handful of distribution center (DC) managers, when they jumped in to help the American Red Cross during recent natural disasters. They work with supply chain challenges every day – from rerouting trucks and managing inventory of millions of items to leading large teams working toward a single purpose. They are uniquely qualified to manage through the stress and constant changes of an event like a hurricane.

In the aftermath of a natural disaster, many of the people working in relief centers are volunteers, and they usually have little to no warehouse or inventory experience. To a DC manager, it’s all second nature, so many of them are ready to offer suggestions on the most efficient ways to get supplies to the people who need it most.

I talked with several of our DC managers who helped after Hurricanes Harvey and Irma. They all mentioned how proud they were to put their skills to work for a good cause, turning something they’re good at into a very valuable disaster relief tool.

To Gina Bood, DC manager in Pauls Valley, Oklahoma, Hurricane Harvey hit home. She grew up in the Houston area and, with a lifelong passion to serve others, immediately wanted to help. She packed up to stay with her dad in Beaumont, Texas, and help at the Red Cross distribution center there. She was only there 24 hours before the Red Cross put her in charge. She helped load and send out trucks every day, taking manual inventory of the products arriving and leaving.

Anna Krajewski, DC general manager in Moberly, Missouri, helped set up the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston. She volunteered to help because she feels like she’s been given a lot of great opportunities in this country. Anna emigrated from Poland in 2002, and talked about her appreciation for the opportunities both the U.S. and Walmart have provided her. If there’s one thing she knew, it was how to move freight. So she jumped in to coordinate shipments between the DCs and the convention center.

Anthony Warren, DC receiving area manager in Clarksville, Arkansas, used his experience from Walmart and his former career at a nonprofit organization to set up a cleaning kit assembly line. He brought in several rollers typically used to unload trucks to create a makeshift conveyor belt. To stay productive while waiting on the rollers to arrive, he worked with the Texas State Guard to form an assembly line. The soldiers gathered the kits so quickly, they soon ran out of items to make them.

Anthony’s setup was so efficient that Paul McAneny, DC assistant general manager in Brooksville, Florida, was asked to replicate it in an Orlando Red Cross facility. Before Paul came to Walmart, he spent 27 years in the military working with organizations like the Red Cross. It’s unusual for a volunteer team to operate a task of that size and scope. But because Paul found himself with a group who had terrific enthusiasm and work ethic, he used his knowledge of warehouse management to help them get the freight flow and inventories right.

Mike Harris, quality assurance operations manager in Sealy, Texas, was familiar with using third-party offsite storage facilities as part of Walmart’s supply chain. When the Kay Bailey Hutchinson Convention Center in Dallas was overloaded with donations, Mike worked with the Dallas mayor’s office to quickly find an alternate storage location and coordinate the trucks to relocate the products.

Willingness to help: It’s just what these associates do. To everyone who helped during these storms, thanks for your passion and for giving your time and skills in a way few others can.

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U.S. Manufacturing

Take a ‘Topeka’ the Mars Candy Factory in Kansas

When you open a package of M&M’s and pour the colorful candy-shelled chocolates into your hand, you may not give much thought to where the candy was made.

Neither did I, until I had the chance to meet some of the people who create these delicious little treats at the Mars Wrigley Confectionery in Topeka, Kansas.

The Topeka facility specializes in creating filled M&M’s ─ like the brand-new M&M’s Caramel, as well as Snickers candy bars. Next year it will add Twix candy bars to the list. And they’re adding 70 new jobs to help take on the expanded production. Over 95% of Mars Wrigley Confectionery products sold in the U.S. are made locally by the company’s team of over 5,000 associates working across 12 domestic sites. More than 300 associates work at the Topeka facility.

Walmart is proud to work with companies like Mars Wrigley to bring locally-made products to customers. That’s why we’ve committed to buy an additional $250 billion in products through 2023, creating new jobs across communities like Topeka.

Check out this video to meet the people who make your favorite candy.

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Community

Acre for Acre Promise Preserves Nature for Generations

As a parent of four young children, watching their reaction to seeing a family of deer walking through a shallow stream will always be one of my fondest memories.

The smiles, giggles and amazement on their faces: It was nature in its purest form and something I hope to be able to experience with my children’s children one day.

Conserving one acre of wildlife habitat for every acre of land Walmart developed was the goal of Acres for America, which was founded in 2005 by a partnership with Walmart and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. That was a commitment of $35 million over 10 years.

That original goal has turned into one of the most impressive collaborations in U.S. land conversation history. In 2015, Walmart renewed its commitment to the program by contributing an additional $35 million over 10 years, with a goal of protecting an additional 1 million acres across the nation. And now the program is creating eight new land conservation projects across Hawaii, Northern California, Southern California, Montana, Texas, Michigan, Minnesota and North Carolina, which will protect and connect wildlife habitats across more than 100,000 acres through $3.8 million in grants and $81.2 million in matching contributions.

The 2017 grants include a rare native Hawaiian forest, longleaf pines in Texas and sustainably harvested forestlands in Minnesota and Montana. They protect ancient redwoods in northern California as well as 1,600 year old bald cypress trees in North Carolina, the oldest known trees east of the Mississippi River.

I’m excited that Walmart is working through their Acres for America program to ensure those beautiful habitats are around for generations to come – one acre at a time.

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Life

12 Days, 12 Ways We’re Helping You Holiday Easier

Eggnog, inflatable Santas, bath bombs, video games – ever feel like the shopping list will never end? No matter how you want to shop – whether in our stores, on our apps or online – we’re here to help. For the next 12 days, we’ll highlight different ways to nail every detail of the holidays so you can rock this Christmas.

Day 6: Save time using grocery delivery

Don’t let a frantic holiday schedule leave you with an empty fridge. When you’re pressed for time or worst of all, can’t make the trip, our delivery service in select cities will bring groceries and more straight to your door. Place an order on Walmart.com and a driver will retrieve your items and escort them to your home. It’s another way we’re helping you shop when and how you want.

So, give it a try - enter your zipcode here to see if this service is available in your area.

Day 5: Shop millions of online items across our brands

We’ve expanded the Walmart family a lot over the last year, which means you have more shopping options than ever at Walmart, Jet.com, Hayneedle, Shoes.com, Moosejaw, Modcloth and Bonobos. Find just the right item for everyone on your list, or check out Jet's Uniquely J line of everyday goods and keep your home stocked for the holiday season.


Day 4: Voice order items on Google Home

“Hey, Google, add baby wipes from Walmart to my cart.”

“Alright, your order history has 500-count Parent's Choice Fragrance-Free Baby Wipes. I can get it from Walmart on Google Express for $8.97. Should I add that to your cart?"

That’s right: shopping just got easier than ever with Google Home's virtual assistant, one of this season’s hottest items. The voice shopping option, coupled free two-day shipping and the Pickup Discount, makes getting what you need at low prices effortless. And just in time for the holidays, when you buy your Google Home or Google Home Mini from Walmart, you can receive up to $25 off when you link your Walmart account to Google Express. Think of it as a little Christmas present to celebrate all your hard work this season.

Day 3: Get groceries quick with your own personal shopper

Our certified personal shoppers are time savers and miracle makers. They have a passion for people, products and exceptional service. Need veggies for dinner tonight? Milk for breakfast tomorrow? With Online Grocery Pickup, our expertly trained associates are standing by in more than 1,100 locations, ready to select the freshest items on your list. Choose from more than 40,000 items and we’ll do the rest. Best of all, we offer same-day service with no price mark-up, no subscription and no fees. Santa's elves will even load your car.

Day 2: Shop millions of items on Walmart.com

We've tripled our assortment on Walmart.com as compared to last holiday season. What does that mean for you? More than 70 million potential gifts for your family and friends alongside the essentials you need every day, from paper towels to hot new electronics and great deals on smart TVs. Best of all, Walmart.com continues to offer free, two-day shipping — no membership required.

Day 1: Use the Walmart app to power through your to-do list

What can you do on the Walmart app this holiday season that’ll save you time and money? Just about anything. Shop for dry groceries, reorder everyday items, refill prescriptions, transfer money, even send last-minute gifts. For quick help, search an item in-store to find the aisle number, or check out featured items to get gift ideas for your family and friends. Even Santa isn’t this good!

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Business

We’re Updating Our Legal Name to Reflect How Customers Want to Shop - Here's Why

Today we announced that we are changing our name from Wal-Mart Stores to Walmart. Why the change? Because of our growing presence as a retailer who serves customers no matter how they choose to shop.

Most of us, and I’d guess all our customers, refer to our company as Walmart and still will. Changing our corporate name from Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., to Walmart Inc. is just a symbol of how customers are shopping us today and how they’ll increasingly shop us in the future. Whether it’s in our stores, on our sites, with our apps, by using their voice or whatever comes next, there is just one Walmart as far as our customers are concerned. When they shop with us, they expect it to be an easy and seamless experience.

Changing our corporate name to Walmart is a way of better reflecting our company’s path to win the future of retail. It’s also a bit about returning to the company’s roots. You might be surprised to learn that, when Sam Walton opened the first store in 1962, the name on the front of the building was simply, “Walmart.” A few years later, we incorporated as Wal-Mart, Inc., and amended the name to Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., when we went public in 1970.

For our associates, while our new legal name removes the dash, we’re not planning to change the Walmart cheer. Getting our blood flowing and choosing not to take ourselves too seriously is still part of our culture. It’s important to have some fun at work, so for our associates in countries where your cheer calls for the squiggly, keep doing it!

We began with great stores and steadily expanded to include clubs and distribution centers. In 1991, we became a global retailer when we opened our first international location in Mexico City, and we launched Walmart.com in 2000. Today we operate under almost 60 different banners around the world, including eCommerce sites, and have more than 11,600 stores and clubs in 28 countries.

Now, we are focused on strengthening stores and clubs around the world to make sure customers continue to have a great experience every time they walk through the door. At the same time, we’re also building our eCommerce and digital capabilities, and we’re putting them together in a way that makes every day easier for busy families. Sam Walton said, “To succeed in this world, you have to change all the time.” He wouldn’t have known that customers in the future would shop on their smart phones or with their voices, but he did know that retail would continue to change. He taught us that, and that for a company to succeed, it has to be agile and innovative.

Even though our corporate name has changed, what won’t change is that Walmart will be there for customers—saving them money and time and helping make every day just a little bit easier.

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