Health & Wellness

Wasting Less Will Save You Food, Money, and More

Imagine walking out of the grocery store with four bags full of fresh food, dropping a bag, and not bothering to stop and pick it up. Seems crazy, but that’s essentially what most of us are doing in our daily lives. The average American throws away about $30 each month in the form of uneaten food. The lettuce that went bad, the leftovers you never got around to eating, and that science experiment in the back of the fridge you’re hoping will disappear – they all add up to the approximately 15% to 25% of food you buy that typically goes uneaten.

That’s real money going straight into the garbage instead of paying off your credit card bills or going toward your savings. Think about it. If you don’t eat half of that $10/pound fish, that’s $5 you’re throwing away. The last third of that pasta sauce jar that got a little tangy? That was at least a dollar’s worth. Day by day, we’re tossing cash out with our trash.

Agriculture uses about half the land area in the United States and a full 80% of the fresh water.  In fact, it takes the same amount of water to produce a hamburger as it does to take a 90-minute shower! Being careful not to waste too much food is actually one of the most environmentally conscious things you can do.  Not to mention, we have a serious hunger problem right here in the U.S., with one out of every six people going without enough food for at least part of the year. To have this food insecurity exist alongside such massive amounts of wasted food simply doesn’t seem right.

The good news is that turning around the food waste trend is not only doable, but it can actually improve your experience with food. What can you do? 

  • Freeze things before they go bad
  • Buy smaller quantities more often
  • Use a shopping list
  • Be realistic about what you really use

Before checking out at the grocery store, compare your list with what’s in the cart. It doesn’t take a huge change – just being careful to not waste food really will make a difference for you, your wallet, and the planet. 

Be the first to comment on this article


2 Dreams, 2 Degrees, and 1 Unconventional Path

Like most moms, Lisa Moore has always bent over backward to put her son Joseph “Joey” Moore in a position to make his dreams come true. But there was one such dream that weighed especially heavy on her.

“I’ll never forget the day Joey came to me and said, ‘Mom, I’m going to go to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,’” Lisa said. “He was only 11 years old when he told me, but his mind was made up. I wanted to help make it happen but, as a single mother, I honestly didn't know where the money was going to come from.”

When Joey neared the end of high school, Lisa’s manager at the Walmart store in Mooresville, N.C. where she worked turned her onto the Associate and Dependent Scholarship Programs offered by the Walmart Foundation. Not only could associates like Lisa apply for scholarship assistance, but so could their high school senior dependents.

That was 2007.  Joey applied for and received a scholarship, and graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  And he’s used his chemistry degree to springboard into a successful career with Henkel Corporation.

But that isn't where the story ends with the Moore family.

“It wasn’t long before Joey started telling me I could do the same thing – that it's never too late to go to college,” said Lisa, 52. “A light came on inside me.”

Already a pastor at Scott’s Chapel United Methodist Church in Statesville, N.C., Lisa recently decided to apply to the Associate Scholarship Program to help finance her enrollment at Hood Theological Seminary School. She, like her son, was awarded a scholarship and is on track to graduate in 2018 with her Masters of Divinity degree. At that point, she plans to focus her efforts full time on the church, pursuing her dream of becoming an elder and possibly even a chaplain.

And she has quite the cheering section behind her.

“There are so many people lifting me up and cheering me on,” Lisa said. That’s why I’ve been with Walmart for 16 years. My job at Walmart has helped put a roof over my head and raise my son, and now it has [helped to support] both of our college educations.

“When I enrolled in seminary, Walmart allowed me to cut back some of my hours to concentrate on school,” she said. “Walmart has always been flexible with my schedule, no matter what was happening in my life and I’m so thankful for that. I’m the biggest cheerleader for this company, not just because of the scholarship program, but because of how it has looked out for me and my family.”

For more than three decades, the Walmart Foundation has made resources available to help U.S. associates and their high school senior dependents fulfill their educational goals through scholarships. More information is available here. 


Health & Wellness

One Community’s Track to a Healthier Lifestyle

Just shy of 198,000. That’s how many square feet the Walmart store I manage in Sanford, Maine covers. But, at this location, I – and the several residents who frequent it at the crack of dawn during the late fall and winter months with gym shoes on – tend to calculate things differently.

Walmart prides itself on being more than a store that offers customers everyday low prices on goods and services. We seek out opportunities to connect with the community on a larger level. One such opportunity here in Sanford has been to open our facility to those looking for a safe environment to get their morning walk in once the temperatures start dropping and the snow starts flying.

There are quite a few folks who know the perimeter of our store – from toys to electronics to dairy and through produce – like the back of their hands. They know a lap is exactly ¼ mile, so four times around equals 1 mile. And, for many, that’s enough to continue working toward a healthier lifestyle.

It all began in early 2014, when Partners for Healthier Communities, a community coalition working to improve the health and well-being of residents in York County, approached us with the idea. We make our store available and promote it with in-store signage. PHC promotes it externally and supplies free pedometers to those who participate.

We offer the option year-round, but during the dead of winter is when it really picks up. We’ll have anywhere from 8 to 20 people doing laps around the store bright and early. When you really step back to think about it, it's a no-brainer. This is a wonderful opportunity for us to contribute something we have – space. There are people who have been walking their entire lives to keep fit. Others are trying to make a positive change or are recovering from surgery. Whatever the case, it’s something we’re going to continue to support.

I love walking in the door in the morning and seeing people doing laps. Once in a while, they even give a tip or two about how to improve our store. That’s a tradeoff I’ll take any day.    

Be the first to comment on this article


‘Thank You Very Much, I Don’t Need Your Help Anymore’

The early ’80s were really tough for my family. I had two babies and no income. But after I got a job, things started changing for the better.

Back in 1984, I knew I wanted to work for my local Walmart in Pearsall, Texas, but I was pregnant with my second child at the time. I figured after having my baby, I would apply for a job. The only downfall was everyone kept telling me, “You need a GED to get into Walmart.” I didn’t have one, so I held back.

Later, in 1986, I found out that you don’t need a GED to apply. As a matter of fact, the company will help you get a GED. I took a chance and spoke with the store manager. After filling out an application and taking an assessment, I headed to my mom’s house to let her know I used her phone number as my contact.

I will never forget, it was a Wednesday. As I pulled up at my mom’s house, she came outside with a big grin and said, “Walmart just called. They want you there Saturday at 1 o’clock.”

From then on, my life changed every day – it was getting easier. One of the best feelings in the world was being able to write a letter to the food stamp office saying, “Thank you very much, but I don’t need your help anymore.” I could make it by myself. So when outside groups perform media stunts and attempt to speak for me and my fellow associates who work hard every day to build better lives, I find it incredibly offensive.

My first job was as a cashier, and by putting in my part, I’ve worked my way up to assistant manager. I was promoted to customer service manager after just three months on the job at the most. From there, I became a floater to learn more about the store and then moved on to department manager, first over stationery and later to men’s, boys’, girls’ and infants’ apparel. After five years in that position, I became a support manager – a job I enjoyed for the longest time before finally accepting the offer to be an assistant manager.

There have been a lot of obstacles along the way, and a third child, but thanks to my determination and a good company, I didn’t quit.

One of my sons, Mario, is following in my footsteps. He started as a pharmacy cashier at age 16 and moved up from there. Now, nearly 15 years later, he’s an assistant manager, too.

When people ask me about Walmart, I use my life as an example. I didn’t graduate, but you know what, this company believed in me. And after nearly 30 years, I don’t give back any less than I did when I started.

The sky’s the limit, but I believe it’s up to you to want it.

Editor’s Note: This post is an update to this video, where Noemi first shared her story with us.

Be the first to comment on this article


A Passion for Taking Grocery Shopping Off Your Plate

When you’re in the business of packing and carrying groceries, those bags tend to get heavier during the holidays.

As e-commerce market coach for Walmart’s online grocery pickup service in Northwest Arkansas, I’m here to tell you that your muscles know it when they’ve been carrying around 14-pound turkeys all day.

But it's not all about weight. With everything from elaborate Thanksgiving and Christmas feasts to New Year’s Eve spreads ramping up, customers rely on my team to come through. It’s about picking produce that’s ripened to perfection. Selecting the right pecans for mom’s very own homemade pie.

As joyous as the holidays can be, they tend to cause some people a bit of stress – and Walmart’s grocery pickup service is one way we’re working to make things a little easier. For many, being able to place their order online and have us bring it out to their car is a blessing. It's one less thing they have to worry about.

I’m so thankful I had the opportunity to help Walmart pilot our online grocery pickup service. It really was a new concept for Walmart in the U.S. And what I’ve enjoyed most has been the conversation with customers while we're loading groceries into their vehicles.

One customer – a mother of four – comes to mind immediately. That family has gotten to know one of our delivery associates so well that, as the mother pulls in, the kids pop their heads out the sunroof and call for him by name. They look forward to seeing him and talk up a storm every time. In the process, we’re able to save that mother a few valuable hours each week in grocery shopping.

For one gentleman, this service has helped him achieve a sense of independence. He rides in his wheelchair to the pickup location down the street from his home a few times a week for his orders. It’s the highlight of his day because it’s something he can do on his own, without assistance from others. And his smile tells the story.

So I was thrilled when, earlier this year, the program was expanded to include select Walmart stores in Charlotte and Fayetteville, N.C.; Salt Lake City and Ogden, Utah; Nashville; Tucson, Ariz.; Colorado Springs, Colo.; and Atlanta. (It’s also available in several other markets – you can find out if your area is included by visiting It's a fast, easy service with pickup that’s always free, and with no markups or subscriptions. But for me, it's so much more.

Helping bring this next phase of Walmart to life has been the best one and a half years of my life. It really has. Years ago, as an assistant manager with Sam’s Club, I helped develop a similar program, but for members who were small business owners. So the job I have now is right up my alley. I love the collaboration, the testing, the innovation that goes into creating a new facet of the business – especially when it’s all about making people’s lives easier.

I’m a country girl who grew up in southeast Missouri. I had no idea I’d be part of something like this, but Walmart continues to trust and open new doors for me. So I continue to do everything I can to make it the best possible experience for our customers. And, right now, that means taking a little weight off their shoulders during the holidays.

Be the first to comment on this article