U.S. Manufacturing

Opening Our Doors – to Open Even Bigger Ones Across America

100 new hires. That’s how many Emilia PC expects to add by the end of this year, all resulting from one step the beauty product manufacturer took roughly 12 months ago: attending Walmart’s Open Call for products that support American jobs.

That’s 100 people who can now choose local employment in De Kalb, Miss., a town of less than 1,000 where Emilia – one of the largest manufacturers of private label and contract health and beauty products in the world – chose to re-shore its merchandise from Israel.

Emilia PC’s decision is the kind of win we’re working hard to help make happen more often in the months ahead. When we pledged to buy an additional $250 billion in products made, assembled, sourced or grown in the U.S. through 2023, we recognized it was bold. But we’re committed to growing U.S. manufacturing and encouraging the creation of American jobs. Supported, in part, by two previously unprecedented events – our Open Call to suppliers and U.S. Manufacturing Summit – we’re on target to reach this goal.

On July 7 and 8, we’re going to make a good thing even better by bringing both of these events together under one roof. We’ll host the “Made in USA” Open Call and U.S. Manufacturing Summit, at the Walmart home office in Bentonville, Ark.

Hundreds of current and potential suppliers from across the country will be face to face with our buyers, pitching their products for the chance to get on shelves at Walmart, Sam’s Club and Walmart.com. Meanwhile, Walmart executives and industry experts will be making valuable connections with suppliers, state representatives and economic development organizations.

Separately, our Open Call and U.S. Manufacturing Summit events sparked countless success stories. Hugh and Nicole Jarratt of Jarratt Industries pitched their plastic taco plates, 1 million of which are now for sale on the shelves of Walmart stores across the country. What began for Luxurien International as an opportunity to sell its contemporary metal bands, camouflage rings and exotic wood jewelry on Walmart.com has grown to include 600 Walmart stores. Luxurien expects to hire an additional 35 employees in 2015 and will break ground on a state-of-the-art production facility near Salt Lake City. And these are just a few from a growing list of examples.

Imagine the possibilities with all of these relationships and opportunities now being hatched at the same time, under one roof. This is how business – and innovation – gets done.    

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Innovation

How Easy Reorder is Making Shopping Even … Easier

Peanut butter beats jelly. Water beats soda. Tortilla chips beat potato chips. These are just a few of the things revealed to us by our new Easy Reorder feature.

What is Easy Reorder? Instead of telling you, let me try and show you. Imagine this … last week you purchased diapers while at your local store. Then you realized you forgot a few things. So, you logged onto Walmart.com and purchased wipes as well as some cleaning supplies and paper towels.

The next time you open the Walmart app, you may notice something different. The site remembers the Walmart.com items you purchased, but also the diapers you bought in your local store – including the brand and size.

Easy Reorder, which is available now on desktops and our mobile app, makes it … well, easy for you to reorder items that you previously purchased at Walmart. Here’s the cool part: We’re integrating both in-store and online purchases to provide you with a single spot to view (and repurchase) the items that you buy most frequently – items like dog food, cereal, shampoo and diapers.

Let me share a little bit more on why we’re doing this. I’ll use myself as an example. I have 151 different items on my Easy Reorder list. I challenge you to go online and try and find 100 individual products to build a list. You’ll find it takes a really long time. Now, you can simply go into a Walmart store, buy the things you need and then, when you come home, everything will be neatly organized on Walmart.com. For me, that means that I get to save a ton of time when I need to repurchase the items I’m looking for. Trust me, with two kids at home, I have to replenish the snack cupboard a lot. Easy Reorder is a game changer.

I’m not the only one who loves this feature. Our customers love it as well, and we’re seeing it in our results – Easy Reorder contributed to the growth we saw in the first quarter.

For fun, I thought I’d share some of the top items on customers’ reorder lists:

Easy Reorder is part of our team’s laser focus on helping customers save both money and time by leveraging our more than 4,700 stores and Walmart.com.

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U.S. Manufacturing

In the News: Inside Our Open Call for American Manufacturing

Shrimp, hair gel, sweet potato cake.

Forbes sent a film crew to Walmart’s corporate office in Bentonville, Arkansas, to capture the excitement as suppliers pitched these and hundreds of other products at our annual U.S. Manufacturing Open Call event.

Forbes shared its inside look today. Take a look at what the big day is like for the people behind the products.

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Community

Why This Associate Wants You to Start With #HelloMyNameIs

“Hello, my name is….” It’s a phrase made up of only four words.

It takes very little time to say – it’s an easy way to begin a conversation. Yet, when people say these words, they can have such a big impact.

My late wife, Kate, started the #HelloMyNameIs campaign in 2013 while living with terminal cancer. As a medic herself, she had become frustrated with nurses and doctors who never introduced themselves to her before providing medical care.

Kate had already been speaking to hospitals and conferences about her experience as both a medical provider and a patient, but through the campaign she hoped to share some key values that resonate beyond people working in healthcare: communication, small acts of kindness, putting the patient at the center of every decision and seeing each person as an individual.

Kate was one of the most determined, resilient people I have ever known. I firmly believe that through adversity, comes legacy. July 23 is International “Hello My Name Is” Day – both the anniversary of Kate’s passing and what would have been our 12th wedding anniversary. We invite everyone – from people to corporations – to join us in celebrating Kate’s legacy by introducing yourself and using #HelloMyNameIs.

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Community

Paper Paved the Way to Success for This Family Business

There are two secrets to C. Ray Kennedy’s business success: an entrepreneurial spirit … and office paper.

In 1992, the bank Ray worked for in Charlotte, North Carolina, was in need of a copy paper supplier, but there were no local businesses offering that service. Ray took a chance and decided to quit his job and create a company that could meet the bank’s needs. Since then, what he started, American Product Distributors, has evolved into a nationwide provider of paper – and so much more – to large government organizations and corporations like Walmart.

APD now creates custom electronic catalogs for a variety of products needed to run a business – office and cleaning supplies, industrial items, branded corporate products like apparel, bags and awards – and houses many of the items within its network of 31 warehouses located across the U.S. The company believes in buying American-made whenever possible and sources the majority of its products from the U.S.

Office supplies may sound commonplace, but streamlining the buying process and offering advice make a huge difference for businesses in two key areas: cost savings and speed, according to Cy Kennedy, son of Ray. Cy has served as president of APD since 2011.

APD started small with three employees and a limited catalog. Twenty-five years later, the organization now employs around 50 people and includes a new software division that uses an updated, redesigned ordering system to save customers money. Walmart, a longtime customer, has found value in the company’s convenience, specialized service and quick turnaround, which is important to a business operating on such a large scale.

While growth is always something to be grateful for, Cy says that APD prides itself instead on its employees’ continued success inside and outside the company. While some have moved up to senior management positions within the family business, Cy said some former employees have gone on to become executives at other companies, and a few who started their careers with APD are now successful politicians or entrepreneurs.

Cy credited the culture his father established – a meritocracy built on kindness and respect for employees, suppliers and customers alike – with contributing to personal success.

That culture extends beyond the walls of the business. Ray’s family established the Kennedy Foundation to reach out to children in need. The foundation has helped feed hundreds of thousands of free meals to kids who don’t have access to healthy food outside of school.

The family also started three daycare centers that focus on serving low-income families. “We’ve prepared a lot of children for school who otherwise wouldn’t hit the ground running,” Cy said. “Some started with us as infants and are now college degree holders.”

Whether it’s in business or in the community, the Kennedys are focused on one thing: finding ways people can help each other.

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