Sustainability

The power of working together

By  Katherine Neebe, Director of Stakeholder Engagement, Walmart March 11, 2014

Farmer in Field

People expect big things from Walmart. And while we recognize our responsibility and opportunity to lead, we also recognize one important idea: What Walmart can do alone is significant, but what we can do together is even better.

With environmental sustainability in particular, this concept is key, and it’s been central to how we’ve approached our work from the beginning. We work with our suppliers, we listen to our customers, we learn from our associates and we engage with leaders. Significantly, we also collaborate with nongovernmental organization (NGOs) and nonprofit organizations on a number of issues.

NGOs provide guidance and expertise – and they hold us accountable. These organizations have pushed us to make bold commitments and helped us deliver on them.

I have worked at the intersection between business and the environment for the past 15 years, most recently at World Wildlife Fund (WWF). It is through this experience that I understand the value that NGOs can bring to bear on some of the world’s most pressing challenges. A core part of my role is to build strategic alliances and establish public-private partnerships that can deliver value and global impact at scale. Fortunately, Walmart has long standing relationships with many of the leading NGOs who can help us do just that.

At our Global Sustainability Milestone Meeting last month, Peter Seligmann, Chairman and CEO of Conservation International (CI), talked about his experiences with Walmart when we first began our sustainability journey 10 years ago. And CI is one of many NGOs with whom we’ve cultivated a close working relationship.

For example, we were the first corporation to work with CDP (formerly the Carbon Disclosure Project) to establish an emissions strategy for our entire supply chain – which encompasses more than 100,000 suppliers across a diversity of sectors around the world. This partnership comprises an integral part of our goal to eliminate 20 million metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions from our global supply chain by the end of 2015. Together, we are working with suppliers who provide us all types of products – from toothpaste to lawn mowers and video games – to measure, manage, reduce and report their impact on climate change.

We’ve also spent seven years working closely with Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) to drive environmentally sustainable practices throughout our supply chain and set new priorities for collaboration, such as sustainable chemistry. In particular, EDF and Walmart are focusing on a global strategy for improving food production and processing in order to mitigate climate impacts and enhance water quality and water efficiency. Most recently, we’ve been addressing fertilizer use. With groceries accounting for half of our sales at Walmart U.S., it’s no wonder that agriculture is a massive opportunity in the area of sustainability. In fact, fertilizer use is responsible for nearly half of Walmart’s carbon footprint in our supply chain. Together with EDF, we are targeting 15 million acres of farmland – comprising 30 percent of food and beverage sales in North America – for optimizing fertilizer practices, which could ultimately avoid 7 million metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions as well as improve waterways and soil health.

So, how do we form these relationships? It happens both formally and informally. For instance, we have established a working group who meets every other month, which includes several leading NGOs, such as CDP, CI, EDF, World Resources Institute and WWF. We also develop annual operating plans to define how we are engaging across areas of mutual interest and to scope out emerging opportunities for collaboration.

No matter how these relationships take shape, we rely on our partners to share their knowledge, expertise and perspectives with us, and we’re very excited about the progress they have helped us make. But we, as a company, certainly don’t have all the answers – and we alone can’t make the social and environmental changes that will help ensure a sustainable future for our business and for the planet. To really drive change at scale across the retail industry, multiple entities must pull in the same direction and work together in ways that we haven’t done in the past.

As we at Walmart continue to pursue our big goals, we will also work toward strengthening our relationships with the NGO community. Together, we will keep exploring ways our company can uniquely make a difference – but more importantly, how we can be one of many contributors toward a more sustainable shared future.

 

Read more from Katherine Neebe

1 Comment

Dawn DeskinsMARCH 11, 2014 12:49 PM

Excellent!

FLAG Reply

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