Sustainability

The Power of Collaboration for Supply Chain Sustainability

Did you know that The Campbell Soup Company has installed a 60 acre, 10-megawatt (MW) solar panel project to run the largest soup plant in the world? The system comprises more than 24,000 solar panels mounted on mechanisms that track the sun each day from east to west and efficiently positions each panel at the optimum angle for maximum electricity generation. Since 2011, these panels have been producing about 15% of the total electricity for the company’s Napoleon, Ohio, manufacturing facility.

Campbell’s solar panel project is part of a much larger trend currently seen in companies of all shapes, sizes, and sectors. Companies are increasingly realizing that energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions management is good for business— and it doesn’t stop with products. Most of the biggest changes that companies can make are behind the scenes, from installing motion sensors on light fixtures to changing out boilers to retrofitting truck fleets. Although you can’t see the solar power in your favorite can of soup, Campbell’s commitments to sustainability benefit the triple bottom line – people, planet, profit – and mean better products for everyone.

Working with Campbell’s on sustainability initiatives helps achieve Walmart’s goal “to sell products that sustain people and the environment.” Currently, Walmart is collaborating with suppliers to collectively reduce 20 million metric tons of GHG from its supply chain by the end of 2015. To accomplish this, Walmart has partnered with CDP (formerly the Carbon Disclosure Project), an international, non-profit organization that provides the only global system for companies to manage and share vital environmental information. CDP works with market forces, including 767 institutional investors with assets of $92 trillion, to motivate companies to disclose their impacts on the environment and natural resources and take action to reduce them by putting these insights at the heart of strategic business, investment and policy decisions.

As a leading member of CDP’s supply chain program, Walmart is learning how its suppliers are achieving real emissions reductions— and in doing so, driving thousands of companies to realize significant GHG emissions and bottom-line savings. Through CDP’s standardized disclosure platform, suppliers are accounting for their carbon footprint, setting strategies for climate resiliency, and reporting detailed energy efficiency improvements from the operational level down to the product level. Collaborative action works: CDP’s Global Supply Chain Report 2014, Collaborative Action on Climate Risk shows that companies that engage with two or more vendors, customers or other partners through CDP are more than twice as likely to both actively reduce GHG emissions and realize a financial return from their emissions reduction investments.

Campbell’s reports to CDP that “Walmart has challenged Campbell to be better stewards of carbon reduction.” Clothing maker HanesBrands agrees, stating that “executive level awareness and support for sustainability along with customer commitment, including the leadership of Walmart, are promoting continual improvements in cost reduction and initiatives leading to GHG reductions.” Even companies you might not have heard of are making real commitments to reduce their energy costs and associated GHG emissions. Utah-based Olson’s Greenhouse Gardens, which supplies poinsettias and other plants for Walmart’s garden centers, reports that "Walmart has driven our efforts to become sustainable and has made us aware of many areas where we can make a difference.  Walmart's interests in reducing their own carbon footprint have pushed our company to consider all initiatives in order to be a more responsible supplier."

Walmart’s leadership is also helping to pilot CDP’s new Action Exchange program. Participating suppliers are encouraged to invest in energy efficiency technologies by helping them identify the most cost-efficient solutions, thereby saving money for themselves, Walmart, and customers around the world. The challenge is enormous, but as Walmart explains in the CDP Global Supply Chain Report Launch 2014 video, “Addressing our carbon footprint is no small feat, but with aggressive targets to reduce emissions, the hard work and creativity of our great associates, and the infrastructure provided by CDP, it’s not an impossible one.”

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Business

When it Comes to Holiday Cheer, Ugly Sweaters Aren’t Wearing Out

A few years back, it was easy to dismiss ugly holiday sweaters as a fad. But this trend has not only taken root – it's stronger and tackier than ever.

The reason is simple: People are looking for happiness and joy during the holidays, and these sweaters make people smile. They spark conversation at parties. They’re fun – and we all need more fun in our lives.

Each year, we’ve seen this new December staple get uglier and more unexpected. And, while Walmart has been front and center in providing affordable, fun options for customers to purposefully “ugly” up their holiday wardrobes, we’ve gone all out this year.

We not only increased the volume of ugly sweaters in our stores, we added several with fun features. Some have working Christmas lights. Some of our sweaters – including a reindeer print – even sing to you. And since November, the women’s elf sweater dress we created has been flying off the shelves as fast as we’ve been able to stock it.

We’ve also ventured beyond the traditional adult sweater. We have a line of ugly sweater-themed T-shirts, with everything from Christmas trees and snowflakes, to gingerbread zombies and Star Wars characters, for men, women and children. We’re even offering ugly holiday sweaters for dogs.

I have to tell you, as a buyer and as a part of the team responsible for creating these sweaters, it was an absolute blast bringing some of these wacky ideas to life. The whole process of adding functioning lights into clothing, battery packs for sound and more – every detail mattered. We knew people would be talking about those items, but we also had to make sure it was going to be easy to remove and reinstall those components before and after the sweaters go through the washing machine. They’re fun but still functional.

We looked at all the details, like, is Santa’s nose pointing the right direction? Is it ugly in the right way? You want to turn heads, but you also want to be sure you're creating options that a teacher feels good about wearing in front of a class, for example.

So we’re proud of what we’ve created and thrilled by the positive response from customers. We’ve even heard about people doing ugly holiday sweater fashion shows. Supporting this tacky tradition is one way we’re helping make the holidays affordable, while also putting a smile on customers’ faces. And it makes our jobs a whole lot of fun.

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Sustainability

How Acres for America is Maintaining the Majestic Midwest

For generations, Midwesterners have retreated to the Arcadia Dunes preserve – an oasis along Lake Michigan – to connect with nature, climb the sand peaks and take in the enormity of America’s third-largest lake.

The 3,600-acre property, also known as the C.S. Mott Nature Preserve, offers public access to one of the largest remaining natural areas along Lake Michigan. There, visitors can partake in some of the Midwest’s best opportunities for hiking, mountain biking, birding and snowshoeing.

Back in 2003, the property’s owners planned to develop the land into a golf-course community with hundreds of homes and condominiums.

“That would have had a domino effect,” said Glen Chown, longtime executive director of the Grand Traverse Regional Land Conservancy, which owns and manages the property. “The development would have led to hundreds of additional homes nearby. Farming would have most likely been pushed out. There would be no public access anywhere.”

The conservancy led a massive campaign to raise more than $30 million to acquire Arcadia Dunes and secure conservation easements on other nearby properties. People rallied to the cause.

Through a combination of gifts large and small, the conservancy and its conservation partners raised nearly all of the required funds. To close the last gap, the conservancy applied for and in 2006 was awarded a $500,000 grant from Acres for America, a collaboration between Walmart and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.

“The Acres for America grant helped us at a time when we had pretty much exhausted every opportunity,” Chown said. “Acres was our closer.”

Acres for America began in 2005, when Walmart made its first commitment of $35 million to purchase and preserve one acre of wildlife habitat in the United States for every acre of land developed by the company – approximately 100,000 acres as of today. The Arcadia Dunes project was one of the program’s earliest grants.

Ten years after the Arcadia Dunes grant was awarded, Acres for America has far surpassed its original goal with more than 1 million acres protected – an area comparable in size to Grand Canyon National Park. In November 2015, Walmart and NFWF announced a 10-year, $35 million renewal of the program.

By offsetting the land Walmart needs to operate with far more valuable land – both to wildlife and to people – the Acres for America program is making a real difference in the quality of life for local communities across the nation.

The preservation of places such as Arcadia Dunes show why Acres for America has become one of the most successful public-private conservation efforts in American history.

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Business

The Pie Chart: Sweet Stats on America’s Favorite Flavors

For many, dessert is the best part of the meal. It’s that special treat that can brighten up any day.

During the holiday season, sweets get a whole new spotlight. Pies in particular can be found on many families’ tables from Thanksgiving through Christmas all the way until year’s end.

Last year, pies at Walmart gained new celebrity appeal with the release of Patti LaBelle’s signature sweet potato recipe. Thanks to a viral video – and pleased palates across America – they have been a hit ever since.

All of this talk about pies got our minds (and stomachs) wondering. With seemingly unlimited pie flavors, we wanted to know which one reigns supreme with our customers’ taste buds. We took a look at our last year of sales, and put together a pie chart (see what we did there) to show the results.

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Opportunity

When a Second Chance at Education Changes Your Life

Sometimes opportunity flashes at the most unexpected times. Like earlier this year, when I happened to look over my husband’s shoulder and noticed an advertisement that has already changed the course of my life.

My husband, an assistant manager at the Walmart supercenter in Palakta, FL, was searching for advancement opportunities on WalmartOne.com – the company intranet. What jumped out at me was the fact that eligible family members of Walmart associates could earn their high school equivalency free of charge via GEDWorks or the Career Online High School program. A bad situation as a teenager kept me from finishing high school – and bills and the decision to start a family made it difficult to ever hop back in and get it done.

But with this, someone was willing to pay my way. I was a little nervous about being lost or overwhelmed at first, but a counselor was always available to answer my questions from the second I enrolled in the program. A short while later, I’d passed my tests and had my high school equivalency. The feeling of pride is beyond anything I’ve ever experienced, and I’m already focused on going to school to become an obstetrics nurse.

I’ve seen the doors Walmart has opened for my husband in his career. The fact that the company is willing to invest in the education of eligible family members like myself, through its Lifelong Learning program, is a blessing.

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