Special delivery for Meals on Wheels

Last Thursday, Margaret Popko opened her front door to receive her lunch. But it wasn’t a normal delivery, just like Margaret isn’t a normal Meals On Wheels recipient.

Jimmy Carter was president, Laverne & Shirley was the most watched television show and Star Wars was the nation’s biggest film when Margaret first volunteered for the Lutheran Service Society of Western Pennsylvania.

She spent 36 years in a small church kitchen in Clairton, about 30 minutes south of Pittsburgh. Like all of our volunteers, Margaret wanted to lend a hand to people in the community who aren’t able to grocery shop or cook for themselves.

Margaret Popko

A few months ago, she was no longer able to make it into the kitchen on a regular basis. At age 95, she joined the nearly 1,000 individuals who receive a meal from us every day.

But there was a problem: our Meals On Wheels kitchen was short on wheels.

Individual volunteers had to use their own cars to transport food from the nearby food bank to our kitchens, and from our kitchen to hundreds of homes throughout the region. It limited how many people like Margaret we were able to serve.

We needed help. Se we applied for a grant through the Walmart Foundation. A few months later, as part of Walmart’s $2 billion commitment to end hunger in the United States, the Foundation awarded us a $65,000 grant to purchase a delivery vehicle.

We officially unveiled the new van on Thursday. Several Walmart associates helped in the kitchen earlier that day.

Meals on Wheels van

The decision of who should receive the inaugural meal was an easy one.  

Store Manager Ed Protiva from the nearby Walmart greeted Margaret at her door. Our brand new van was parked on the street outside.

“That should make things easier!” Margaret said. “It looks good.”

From Clairton the van went on to deliver food for individuals in Allegheny, Beaver, Butler and Mercer counties.

A single meal may not seem like much, but each and every delivery we make is a connection, a conversation, and a helping hand that people depend on. Walmart’s dedication to our community makes a big difference to us, and makes it possible for use to serve more people like Margaret.

Patty Davidson is the Chief Development Officer of the Lutheran Service Society of Western Pa. To learn more about LSSWPA or to volunteer for the Meals On Wheels program, please visit



Gov. Deal on ‘The Silicon Valley of the South’

As Walmart opens a new e-commerce fulfillment center in Atlanta, we caught up with Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal for a quick chat about his home state – and its growing reputation as a tech incubator.

WMT: What is the most exciting thing about being governor of Georgia?

Deal: Our economy is seeing positive growth with thousands of new jobs added every month. We’re seeing the telltale signs of cranes and bulldozers humming on newly cleared land. We’re seeing home values recover and Georgia families rebuild their savings. In fact, since the start of my first term in 2011, we’ve helped create more than 400,000 private sector jobs. Companies representing a wide variety of industries continue to expand and relocate here. This growth strengthens local communities and our state as a whole.

WMT: What, if anything, can the public and private sectors teach each other about innovation?

Deal: Early in 2011, we put in place what we call the Competitiveness Initiative, a joint effort with leaders from government, universities and technical colleges and the private sector. The initiative examined six key factors identified by site selectors as the most important influencers in corporate location and expansion decisions:

  • Infrastructure
  • Innovation
  • Education and workforce development
  • Friendly business climate 
  • Global commerce
  • Government efficiency

Based on the recommendations from public and private stakeholders, we’ve been able to implement several positive policy changes and programs. This innovation and collaboration has served — and will continue to serve — Georgians well.  

WMT: What does the Walmart e-commerce fulfillment center opening mean for Atlanta’s identity as a burgeoning tech hub?

Deal: Georgia has experienced rapid growth in the tech sector in the past several years. In fact, Atlanta has been dubbed the “Silicon Valley of the South” due to our growing reputation as a technology hub. With the addition of Walmart’s fulfillment center, Georgia continues to cement its reputation as a tech incubator and innovator. These well-paying, high skills jobs are indeed the jobs of the future. We know that between now and the year 2020, STEM field occupations will introduce more than 79,000 new jobs to Georgia. In response, we’ve made significant investments and policy changes in order to prepare our students and workforce for these future jobs. I’m excited that Walmart has chosen to bring these cutting-edge jobs to Georgia, and I look forward to its continued growth in this industry. 

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The Food Truck That Keeps on Giving

For Alyssa Snyder, Margaret Thomas and Aron Shelton, flipping through photographs from the past four years serves as a reminder of just how far a single idea can evolve. And how a few people can contribute to raising the quality of life for many.

Their idea – Seeds That Feed, a Fayetteville, Arkansas-based organization committed to collecting and distributing fresh produce to those who need it – began with the desire to be a part of something that mattered in their community.

“Food banks need more fresh fruits and vegetables,” Snyder explained. “I thought back to growing up in a neighborhood with huge gardens and how people were always sharing bags of fresh vegetables they had grown. So we asked ourselves, what if we started an organization that asked Fayetteville residents with gardens to plant an extra row of seeds for us?”

A large supply of lettuce sits on a wooden outdoor table

Only, they never had to make that request, because they realized the network of farmers participating in the Fayetteville Farmers Market was an existing resource with a surplus of fruits and vegetables. After every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday market on the town’s downtown square, surplus produce was usually lugged back home and fed to livestock, or composted unnecessarily. So Seeds That Feed set out to coordinate with farmers to collect surplus to help stock the shelves of a local food bank.

Their first collection yielded a modest 35 pounds. But by the end of the first season, the organization was gathering up to 600 pounds of fresh produce in a given day, which was eclipsed by a record 772 pounds following a Tuesday market earlier this summer. Over the past four years, Seeds That Feed has grown to collaborate with a network of more than 40 growers at the Fayetteville Farmers Market and across the region, delivering more than 47,000 pounds of donated produce to more than 25 programs and organizations across the region.

“I remember getting on my phone the first time we hit 600 pounds and literally calling every food bank we could think of because we had more produce than just one could handle,” Shelton said. “Our idea had started to take on a life of its own.”

A farmer closely examines produce growing in the ground

Through a recent grant from the Walmart Foundation, Seeds That Feed expanded its reach even further with the launch of its Mobile Food Network in July, including a mobile produce pantry. The pantry – a repurposed box truck retrofitted to bring a fresh market to low-income housing complexes, local churches and service organizations – offers free produce to food-insecure segments of the community. In addition, Seeds That Feed has begun assembling “cookboxes,” food packaged with recipe cards, to enable patrons to utilize donated produce to develop healthy meals.

“The Mobile Food Pantry really is like a dream come true,” Thomas said. “It's so far beyond anything we ever imagined this organization could become, and these farmers have become like family to us along the way. It's an amazing collaboration. When an 80-year-old woman talks about what it's like to eat fresh tomatoes for the first time since she was a kid, it motivates you to keep wanting to reach more people.”

A large white box truck with the Seeds that Feed logo is parked on the road.

And that’s precisely what Seeds That Feed plans to continue doing.

“Something as simple as having a meal with your family can change your day, and we’re working to make things like that possible every day,” Snyder said. “We’re proud of what this organization has become. It has all come together from learnings – and the beautiful thing is that it can all be replicated.”

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Why This Tiny Chip Has Huge Security Benefits

If you’ve received any new credit cards in the last year or so, take a close look: There may be a microchip right above the card number. While that tiny chip can be easy to miss, soon it won’t be – starting this week, many retailers are using it to make a small change in your checkout process.

Because this tiny chip offers much greater security benefits versus traditional signature-based, magnetic stripe technology, on Oct. 1 many retailers, including Walmart, will begin prompting customers not to swipe, but to “dip” – aka insert and briefly leave the card in the payment terminal. 

Here’s how it works:

A GIF of a Credit Card being swiped in a credit card machine at cash wrap

Using a chip card to pay means the chip assigns a dynamic code that changes each time consumers use the card. Even if the code were obtained, it could not be used to make an additional purchase.  So when considering the risk of counterfeit, a chip is much more difficult to duplicate. 

So why the significance of Oct. 1? That’s the date set by Visa, MasterCard, American Express and Discover for the liability of credit card fraud to shift from credit card issuers to retailers. Merchants that haven’t changed their terminals to read chips could be responsible for fraud.

Walmart has long been pushing toward payments that give our customers more security than the traditional signature-based, magnetic stripe technology. In fact, here’s something else you may not know:  We began installing hardware that had the capability of accepting microchip cards more than nine years ago, and we activated the functionality on Nov. 1, 2014. Additionally, in 2014, both Walmart and Sam’s Club issued chip-enabled MasterCard cards to our branded cardholders. 

While the cards are changing, you will still have the quick, simple checkout experience you're accustomed to at Walmart and Sam’s Club. If you don’t have a microchip card, you can continue using your magnetic stripe card at Walmart and Sam’s Club just the same. In fact, when it comes to debit cards, many banks have not issued chip-enabled cards anyway: Only 25% of debit cards will be transferred to the new system by the end of 2015, according to a recent study by Pulse, a PIN debit network.

Walmart was among the first retailers to implement chip technology to better secure payments for credit card holders, and now, we’re finally starting to see this shift take place.

For additional resources regarding chip-enabled payments, visit the news section of our website.

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2 Dreams, 2 Degrees, and 1 Unconventional Path

Like most moms, Lisa Moore has always bent over backward to put her son Joseph “Joey” Moore in a position to make his dreams come true. But there was one such dream that weighed especially heavy on her.

“I’ll never forget the day Joey came to me and said, ‘Mom, I’m going to go to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,’” Lisa said. “He was only 11 years old when he told me, but his mind was made up. I wanted to help make it happen but, as a single mother, I honestly didn't know where the money was going to come from.”

When Joey neared the end of high school, Lisa’s manager at the Walmart store in Mooresville, N.C. where she worked turned her onto the Associate and Dependent Scholarship Programs offered by the Walmart Foundation. Not only could associates like Lisa apply for scholarship assistance, but so could their high school senior dependents.

That was 2007.  Joey applied for and received a scholarship, and graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  And he’s used his chemistry degree to springboard into a successful career with Henkel Corporation.

Associate Lisa Moore with coworker inside store

But that isn't where the story ends with the Moore family.

“It wasn’t long before Joey started telling me I could do the same thing – that it's never too late to go to college,” said Lisa, 52. “A light came on inside me.”

Already a pastor at Scott’s Chapel United Methodist Church in Statesville, N.C., Lisa recently decided to apply to the Associate Scholarship Program to help finance her enrollment at Hood Theological Seminary School. She, like her son, was awarded a scholarship and is on track to graduate in 2018 with her Masters of Divinity degree. At that point, she plans to focus her efforts full time on the church, pursuing her dream of becoming an elder and possibly even a chaplain.

And she has quite the cheering section behind her.

“There are so many people lifting me up and cheering me on,” Lisa said. That’s why I’ve been with Walmart for 16 years. My job at Walmart has helped put a roof over my head and raise my son, and now it has [helped to support] both of our college educations.

“When I enrolled in seminary, Walmart allowed me to cut back some of my hours to concentrate on school,” she said. “Walmart has always been flexible with my schedule, no matter what was happening in my life and I’m so thankful for that. I’m the biggest cheerleader for this company, not just because of the scholarship program, but because of how it has looked out for me and my family.”

For more than three decades, the Walmart Foundation has made resources available to help U.S. associates and their high school senior dependents fulfill their educational goals through scholarships. More information is available here.