Health & Wellness

Sneaky Veggies: 7 Recipes to Get Kids to Eat Healthy

It can be hard to get your kids to eat vegetables and fruits. If this is true in your family, you are not alone.  Did you know that most children do not get the daily recommended amounts of vegetables and fruits in their diets? As a mother of three, I can honestly say that I can relate to that statement. Two of my children are pretty good about eating vegetables and trying new things, but my youngest, well, that’s a whole other ball game. He won’t eat any vegetables at all!

I’ve always been a little jealous of the moms that say their kids will eat anything. With my youngest, it’s always been a struggle. I used to think I was a bad parent, but I have come to realize that this is more common than I thought, and all kids are just different. It took a long time for me to quit fighting a losing battle, and just accept that all I needed was a new game plan. I told myself, if he won’t eat any vegetables, then you are just going to have to start hiding them.


1. Healthy Fruit or Veggie Muffins

Spiced Carrot Muffins

I was excited and started out with baked goods. My youngest is known around our house as the Muffin Man! If I want him to eat something nutritious, I just toss it in a muffin and he gobbles it up. I started experimenting and made these Healthy Peanut Butter Banana Muffins (packed with protein and goodness). These muffins are made with ripe bananas, peanut butter, honey, Greek yogurt, and the combination of whole wheat and all purpose flour. These are a great option to pack in school lunches. 


Because my major struggle was vegetables, I started incorporating vegetables into different muffins. I use carrots to make Spiced Carrot Muffins, and zucchini for Zucchini Bread Muffins. My youngest son loved every muffin and had no idea he was eating vegetables. I was so excited to have finally found a way to sneak a little goodness into his diet. 

I  usually spend a day steaming, shredding and pureeing vegetables for cooking and baking. I separate everything into one-cup packets and then store those packets in a large zip-top bag and place it in the freezer. This way I have pureed veggies on hand anytime I want to be sneaky!   


2. Black Bean Brownies

Black Bean Brownies


Beans are also a great source of protein and wonderful in baked goods. I use pureed black beans for Black Bean Brownies and pureed white beans to make White Bean Banana Bread. You can also use white bean puree in macaroni and cheese or white bean chocolate chip cookies.
 

3. Sneaky Spaghetti Sauce

Sneaky Spaghetti Sauce


You can also hide all sorts of vegetables in sauces. I came up with this Sneaky Spaghetti Sauce because my son loves spaghetti. This spaghetti sauce has all sorts of different hidden vegetables like tomatoes, onions, zucchini, carrots, celery and peppers. This is where having pureed veggies on hand in the freezer comes in so handy. Another trick is to use your favorite regular spaghetti sauce and just add shredded veggies to meatballs, and use oatmeal in place of bread crumbs.


4. Green Monster Smoothie

Green Monster Smoothie


Sometimes making silly names for foods will get your kids to eat just about anything. This Green Monster Smoothie is very popular in our house. I introduced this smoothie on St. Patrick’s Day several years back, and now it is a family favorite. It’s packed full of spinach, bananas and almond milk. My daughter said it looked just like the green slime from Nickelodeon, but tastes just like a banana smoothie. 

A few other favorite smoothies are Blueberry Oatmeal Smoothie, Strawberry Banana Smoothie or a Watermelon Strawberry Smoothie. Pureeing into a smoothie is the perfect way to disguise something. 


5. Frozen Yogurt Covered Blueberries

Yogurt Covered Blueberries


My kids are better with fruits than vegetables, but they still don’t get their full share. Sure, they love bananas, strawberries and apples, but sometimes getting them to eat other fruits can also be a challenge. I have found that my kids love Frozen Yogurt Covered Blueberries. You can use plain yogurt with honey or vanilla yogurt; both are wonderful.


6. Fruit & Yogurt Parfait

Fruit and Yogurt Parfait

Let your kids make their own fruit parfaits using their favorite flavored yogurt, fruit and granola. I have found that when children help with meal and food prep, they are much more likely to try whatever it is they are making. These yummy Fruit & Yogurt Parfaits are a great choice.


7. Healthy Peanut Butter Balls

Healthy Peanut Butter Balls


Last but not least are these Healthy Peanut Butter Balls. I make these at least once a week to pack in my kids’ lunches. My kids, as well as my husband, love these and have no idea that they are packed full of protein, ground flaxseed and wheat germ. I always smile when my kids come home from school and ask me to pack a few extras, because their friends are asking them to share.     

I have come to realize that some kids just don’t eat a well-balanced diet, and begging and pleading just doesn’t work. I advise giving up the battle and give into being a little sneaky, because sometimes it’s the only way.


Walmart Mom blogger, Tina Butler is the mom behind the blog
Mommy’s Kitchen. Tina loves creating meals that are simple, delicious, and perfect for bringing families together at the table. 

Now until August 4, you can join Walmart's Eat Healthy Together Challenge for a chance to win a $25 Walmart gift card. Learn more: foundation.walmart.com/eathealthytogether


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Community

One Nurse, 16 Infants, and a Storm’s Ultimate Test

Medea Gabriel is not a hero, she insists.

During Hurricane Katrina, there were many others she believes are equally deserving of that title. Her fellow medical staff at New Orleans Memorial Medical Center who worked while separated from their families. Her best friend, Monique, who took Medea’s ailing mother to evacuate on her own. Also, the strangers she remembers driving their personal boats to pick up patients and staff from the hospital and navigate them to dry land.

But as a nurse in the neonatal intensive care unit, Medea helped wrap up 16 babies and move them to shelter through a hole in the wall that led to a truck bed. The truck bed was to take them to a helicopter and then, safety, but once Medea passed each infant through the wall, she had no idea if outside realities would let that happen.

Today, she knows that nearly all of those babies somehow survived on the way to their destination, Baton Rouge Women’s Hospital. While one of them did pass away, she doesn’t know how or when, because that hospital has since closed. She recently got a Facebook message from one of the mothers who wanted to thank her for what she did that day.

“It was surreal to know how much I impacted her life and that she remembered me,” Medea said. “Just knowing that these kids are now 10 years old lets me go on.”

Photo shows the inside of a neonatal intensive care unit

When Medea transported those infants that day, she says she was simply doing her job. Once the job was complete, she turned her full attention toward her mother, whom she sent with her best friend to get on a boat to safety. She had to pack up her mother’s medicine, waterproof her medical records and dosage instructions and staple them to the inside of her mother’s clothes so they didn’t get lost. She then sent her two loved ones off to stay with a college roommate whom she believed in her heart would take them in, but she didn’t know for sure. It was the second big moment that day where she had to simply act.

Thankfully, two days later – after Medea herself had to leave the hospital not knowing her next resting place – she found out that her mother was, in fact, alive.

While many things have changed for Medea since then, like a new job and also a new husband, she has returned home to New Orleans and works with pediatric patients once again, this time doing HIV research.

“I’m in a totally different place than I was before Katrina,” she said. “I’ve found peace and joy in this recovery.”

Editor’s Note: You can hear more of Medea’s story in a four-part podcast created by Good360, a disaster relief organization that works to improve the way communities can connect with much-needed supplies.    

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Health & Wellness

Fresh, Fast and Fun: Stay on Track with Produce Hacks

As the freshness of a new year wears away, so can those changes we laid out for our diets. No one wants to eat healthy food if it doesn’t taste good. And sometimes throwing together a salad for tomorrow’s lunch is the last thing we want to do at the end of a long day.

But when we take a look at food trends and what our customers are buying, we see a couple of things that help keep the diet momentum going: easy options that free up time, and, when there’s a few extra minutes to make cooking fun, new ways of giving healthier selections a gourmet touch.

With that in mind, here are some choices that are gaining steam – and you can work them into your routine simply by spending a few extra minutes in the produce section.

Brussels sprouts. Strong in flavor and smell, Brussels sprouts have long been that vegetable many people love to hate. But sales of Brussels sprouts are growing for retailers as customers are drawn to new ways of preparing them. Roasting or grilling and adding a pop of flavor like balsamic vinegar or garlic makes them seem decadent.

RecipeCards_Brussel Sprouts w Yogurt Drizzle
Spaghetti squash or spiral-cut zucchini. Have you ever heard of a zoodle? If you got a spiral slicer as a holiday gift, you’re probably aware that zucchini is becoming increasingly popular as a pasta replacement. Spaghetti squash, too, is a delicious alternative to dishes that call for noodles.

Cauliflower. From pizza crust to a mashed potato stand-in, cauliflower is growing out of its standing as a bland, forgotten salad ingredient. If you’d rather not use it in place of one of these carbs, try cutting a head of it into large slices and grilling it like a steak.

Chopped salad. When you don’t have a huge lettuce leaf to chase around your plate or, later, shove awkwardly in your mouth, a salad becomes much easier to eat. Imagine everything you’d want in a salad, processed in a chopper – that’s a chopped salad. It’s simple to make and store in the fridge, and we’re seeing customers prepare more of them.

RecipeCards_Convenient Chopped Salad

Salad kits and bowls. If you spend any time on Pinterest, you’ve probably seen the Mason jar salad concept. Here’s how our customers are eating healthier and saving more time: Purchasing single-serve ready-to-eat salad bowls, which include a protein, the dressing and a disposable fork. Also popular are salad kits, which have everything in the bag except a main protein. Just shake into a bowl and you’ve got a fresh side dish for the whole family.

Premium juice. If you don’t have a juicer – or the time to use one – you’ll find prepared juices right next to the produce in select Walmart stores. These aren’t the fruit cocktail variety (mixed juices are available in the dairy department) but instead are very pure, unprocessed and premium in nature.

Kale. This leafy green has been surging in popularity for a few years now, and it’s not going away. A few years ago you’d find just a couple of kale options in our stores; today we offer it in salad blends, plus readymade kale chips, dips and more. It’s a super food that’s also super versatile.

RecipeCards_Crunchy Kale Salad

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Community

With Grit and Heart, Two Mississippi Stores Return

Pass Christian, Mississippi, is a small town of only a few thousand people, but it has always been a huge part of Kim Claycomb’s life. It’s where she grew up and went to high school, and later built a career at the local Walmart.

In the last few days of August 2005, Kim’s community was forever changed as Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast. Kim’s home was damaged, not destroyed, but her workplace – the supercenter she and her colleagues affectionately named “The Store by the Shore,” was ruined beyond repair.

After the storm hit, many Walmart associates went to work at other stores. Several in the Pass Christian area headed to another nearby small community, Waveland, to serve local residents in a makeshift store they created inside a tent in the parking lot.

Today, Kim works at a Neighborhood Market in Gulfport, but as her store in Pass Christian was being reconstructed, she drove by every day and took photos of its progress. When the building was complete, she recalled the mayor talking excitedly about the grand opening on the local news.

“I never thought a Walmart would have that big of an impact, but it did,” Kim said. “Seeing customers who remembered us from before … those people are like family to me. Coming back was a big deal.”

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Community

Katrina Devastated, But Courage and Compassion Survived

The line at the Slidell, Louisiana, Sam’s Club gas station stretched as far as Mike Turner’s eyes could see. As he walked around the corner of the cashier’s post, a state trooper’s patrol vehicle emerged from the dusty procession.

Demand for fuel  – on top of food, water and other necessities – was high in those days after Hurricane Katrina, and any time Mike, then a regional general manager at Sam’s Club, and his colleagues saw a public official, they made a point to ask how they could help.

“In his car, he had water, diapers, formula, socks. I stopped and talked to him,” Mike recalled. “‘Hey, you’ve been working hard,’ I said. He replied, ‘You’re about to see a state trooper cry.’"

The majority of the exterior of a Sam's Club is ripped a part and the rubble is piled together in a parking lot

The officer had been on duty for two days straight, he said, and he’d just gotten approved for a two-hour break from his post. He’d headed to Sam’s Club for essentials to take to his wife and infant child, who didn’t evacuate before the storm because his job required him to stay in the area. With electricity out and hurricane damage all around, the officer said he was grateful for any glimpse of normalcy.

A long line of customers with blue shopping carts snake through a Sam's Club parking lot

Mike was just doing his job that day, working a six-week stint overseeing Sam’s Clubs in Katrina-affected areas of the Gulf. While he and his colleagues did many things they’d never had to before – sleeping on Sam’s Club floors and figuring out how to serve customers without cash registers, refrigeration and lighting –  10 years later, it’s moments like those with the trooper that stick in his mind.

He also remembers the time as one where he and many other associates had to make quick but important decisions based more on gut and conscience than normal policy and procedures.

“We created a sense of calm for members and associates. … We didn’t open up every club the day after the storm, but when we did get them open, we opened for everyone. There was no membership fee. We just did whatever we had to do, whether it was FEMA needing a pallet of water or a church with 700 people.”

‘I Hope I Don’t Get Fired’

Once a police officer and firefighter, in 2005, Jason Jackson put those skills to work as director of emergency management at Walmart, where he led the company’s Emergency Operations Center: a hub at the corporate office where leadership coordinates efforts to help affected associates; restore store, club and DC operations; and support communities.

Walmart associates fill a room full of computers and screens

While Jason’s role put him formally in charge of Walmart’s response to one of the country’s biggest disasters, he insists that the real heroes during Katrina were the thousands of associates who acted with courage and compassion. Some of those stories are lesser known – such as a cashier contributing a few dollars to the baskets of families who needed it, or Walmart emergency responders giving their own food away to families who were hungry – and others, such as truck drivers who drove through difficult conditions and waited for hours on the highway to bring relief supplies into devastated communities, are ingrained in company culture.

The entry  area to a Walmart store has products thrown on the floor and signs are hanging off the wall

“Our associates were empowered to help,” he said, but recalled one former co-manager in Waveland, Mississippi specifically who became a “poster child” because of her inspiring actions. After riding out the storm with her family at home, she traveled to her store that was heavily damaged. Upon seeing so many people in the community in need, she drove a front end loader through the building to seek out salvageable merchandise and later gave away what she could, such as food, water, shoes and clothes.

About a day and a half after Katrina’s landfall, Dale Snowden, director of disaster response and recovery, arrived in Waveland to assess the damage. He had a satellite phone, and called the Emergency Operations Center to report back.

“’Hey, the co-manager is here, she wants to talk to you,’” Jason recalls Dale saying. “She was happy and crying at the same time. ‘I hope I don’t get fired’ were the first words out of her mouth. After reassuring her, she was quick to let us know what her community needed. In fact, it became the location for our first tent store.”

Dale, who worked as a builder and insurance adjustor earlier in his career, worked on the ground in the Gulf for an entire month that year coordinating repairs and reporting back on the status of Walmart locations. Since then he’s done the same during the aftermath of many other natural and mand-made disasters, from fires and tornados in the U.S. to an earthquake and tsunami in Japan.

While philanthropy is a big part of Walmart’s response to any disaster, he said, he believes getting local stores back up and running is equally important, and not just for the obvious – restoring access to the things that people need.

“It’s not just about donating water or ringing the registers,” Dale said, “it’s about returning to people a sense of normalcy and that things are going to be OK. People think, ‘Hey, that’s my Walmart.’ I didn’t set out to be a recovery expert, but it’s very rewarding being able to fulfill people’s needs and help them when they need it most.”

Rebuilding in Biloxi

Beth Harrell, a department manager at a Walmart supercenter in Biloxi, Mississippi, remembers a similar response from the community when her store opened three weeks after Katrina.

“We constantly heard, ‘We’re so glad to see you all are still here!’” she recalled.

A parking lot of a Walmart store is flooded

Beth, too, was glad to return to work after her family made it through the storm safely. When the storm was at its strongest, she’d evacuated to McComb, Mississippi, with her oldest son and his girlfriend, while her husband stayed home to guard the house. Even in McComb, about 130 miles northwest of Biloxi, Beth lost power and heard trees snapping, leaving her thinking the worst for her husband, who was at their house a block from the beach.

Phone service was out, too, so she didn’t hear from him for more than a week. When she finally did, he had quite the harrowing story.

“He saw it coming up under the door and thought to go get towels, but when he stepped away, the force of the water bent the door up like it was rubber. The water rushed in, and everything floated out.”

The couple had two dogs, a Labrador and a terrier. With the inside of the house now flooded with more than 4 feet of water, her husband swam out of the house with the smaller dog but had to go back and rescue the Lab.

Later, Beth and her husband would spend a year living in a FEMA trailer in their front yard, rebuilding their home in their spare time. While her husband passed away a few years ago, she still works at the same Walmart store as a department manager in apparel, and can recall more than a few blessings that came out of such a horrific storm.

“Our community became stronger. Everybody just jumped in and started helping each other,” Beth said. “We didn’t just sit back and go, ‘Oh, woe is me.’ I got to know a lot of my neighbors a lot better. Thank God nobody I knew lost their lives.”

From Red Cross to Retail

Lee Siler didn’t work for Walmart in 2005, but as then-director of the Northwest Arkansas chapter of the American Red Cross, he’d built relationships with the Walmart emergency management team and worked in the Emergency Operations Center when Katrina hit. It was an arrangement that allowed the two entities to communicate faster and get relief to affected areas much more quickly, he said.

Among all the memories he has of that intense period, joining one particular meeting following the storm’s landfall is one that left an impression on him.

Walmart's Emergency Operations Center is filled with associates working on computers

“There was a long table, and Lee Scott [former Walmart CEO] was there. They spent an hour and 15 minutes talking about how they were going to take care of their people, get checks to them, make sure they had jobs, how to get them safe and sound,” he said. “Not once during that whole time did they talk about stores being destroyed or impact to operations, until the very last 15 minutes. That told me right then and there that Walmart was serious when they say that our associates come first. In that meeting I saw that come to life. Senior leadership got out of the way and gave people the power to take care of what needed to be done.”

The next year, when Walmart called and offered him a job leading community grant programs and disaster relief and resiliency, he knew it was a good fit. Now, he provides guidance to store and facility managers on disaster response and works with nonprofit organizations through the Walmart Foundation to distribute grant money that helps continue community recovery efforts.

Disaster recovery became Lee’s career field indirectly after working at a small town chamber of commerce where he uncovered a passion for working with volunteers, which led him a later position with the Red Cross.

Lee said. “These people are doing it because they want to, not because they get paid for it. You get the right volunteer in the right spot, and they can move mountains.”

Lee has seen that happen time and time again, he said, especially at the Walmart Associate Support Call Center, which is manned by volunteers.

“This isn’t their job, and it’s open until 9 or 10 at night. They’re signing up to help associates who are having the worst day of their entire life. Their homes may be destroyed, yet the associates want to step up and help.”

Today, Lee gets to work with volunteers on a global scale at Walmart, where he works to use the lessons learned from Katrina to continually improve the company’s disaster response moving forward.

“The positive impact that we can have on our customers, associates and communities around the globe is what keeps me here,” he said. “Nowhere else would I have the opportunity to do what I do.” 

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