Health & Wellness

Sneaky Veggies: 7 Recipes to Get Kids to Eat Healthy

It can be hard to get your kids to eat vegetables and fruits. If this is true in your family, you are not alone.  Did you know that most children do not get the daily recommended amounts of vegetables and fruits in their diets? As a mother of three, I can honestly say that I can relate to that statement. Two of my children are pretty good about eating vegetables and trying new things, but my youngest, well, that’s a whole other ball game. He won’t eat any vegetables at all!

I’ve always been a little jealous of the moms that say their kids will eat anything. With my youngest, it’s always been a struggle. I used to think I was a bad parent, but I have come to realize that this is more common than I thought, and all kids are just different. It took a long time for me to quit fighting a losing battle, and just accept that all I needed was a new game plan. I told myself, if he won’t eat any vegetables, then you are just going to have to start hiding them.


1. Healthy Fruit or Veggie Muffins

I was excited and started out with baked goods. My youngest is known around our house as the Muffin Man! If I want him to eat something nutritious, I just toss it in a muffin and he gobbles it up. I started experimenting and made these Healthy Peanut Butter Banana Muffins (packed with protein and goodness). These muffins are made with ripe bananas, peanut butter, honey, Greek yogurt, and the combination of whole wheat and all purpose flour. These are a great option to pack in school lunches. 


Because my major struggle was vegetables, I started incorporating vegetables into different muffins. I use carrots to make Spiced Carrot Muffins, and zucchini for Zucchini Bread Muffins. My youngest son loved every muffin and had no idea he was eating vegetables. I was so excited to have finally found a way to sneak a little goodness into his diet. 

I  usually spend a day steaming, shredding and pureeing vegetables for cooking and baking. I separate everything into one-cup packets and then store those packets in a large zip-top bag and place it in the freezer. This way I have pureed veggies on hand anytime I want to be sneaky!   


2. Black Bean Brownies


Beans are also a great source of protein and wonderful in baked goods. I use pureed black beans for Black Bean Brownies and pureed white beans to make White Bean Banana Bread. You can also use white bean puree in macaroni and cheese or white bean chocolate chip cookies.
 

3. Sneaky Spaghetti Sauce


You can also hide all sorts of vegetables in sauces. I came up with this Sneaky Spaghetti Sauce because my son loves spaghetti. This spaghetti sauce has all sorts of different hidden vegetables like tomatoes, onions, zucchini, carrots, celery and peppers. This is where having pureed veggies on hand in the freezer comes in so handy. Another trick is to use your favorite regular spaghetti sauce and just add shredded veggies to meatballs, and use oatmeal in place of bread crumbs.


4. Green Monster Smoothie


Sometimes making silly names for foods will get your kids to eat just about anything. This Green Monster Smoothie is very popular in our house. I introduced this smoothie on St. Patrick’s Day several years back, and now it is a family favorite. It’s packed full of spinach, bananas and almond milk. My daughter said it looked just like the green slime from Nickelodeon, but tastes just like a banana smoothie. 

A few other favorite smoothies are Blueberry Oatmeal Smoothie, Strawberry Banana Smoothie or a Watermelon Strawberry Smoothie. Pureeing into a smoothie is the perfect way to disguise something. 


5. Frozen Yogurt Covered Blueberries


My kids are better with fruits than vegetables, but they still don’t get their full share. Sure, they love bananas, strawberries and apples, but sometimes getting them to eat other fruits can also be a challenge. I have found that my kids love Frozen Yogurt Covered Blueberries. You can use plain yogurt with honey or vanilla yogurt; both are wonderful.


6. Fruit & Yogurt Parfait

Let your kids make their own fruit parfaits using their favorite flavored yogurt, fruit and granola. I have found that when children help with meal and food prep, they are much more likely to try whatever it is they are making. These yummy Fruit & Yogurt Parfaits are a great choice.


7. Healthy Peanut Butter Balls


Last but not least are these Healthy Peanut Butter Balls. I make these at least once a week to pack in my kids’ lunches. My kids, as well as my husband, love these and have no idea that they are packed full of protein, ground flaxseed and wheat germ. I always smile when my kids come home from school and ask me to pack a few extras, because their friends are asking them to share.     

I have come to realize that some kids just don’t eat a well-balanced diet, and begging and pleading just doesn’t work. I advise giving up the battle and give into being a little sneaky, because sometimes it’s the only way.


Walmart Mom blogger, Tina Butler is the mom behind the blog
Mommy’s Kitchen. Tina loves creating meals that are simple, delicious, and perfect for bringing families together at the table. 

Now until August 4, you can join Walmart's Eat Healthy Together Challenge for a chance to win a $25 Walmart gift card. Learn more: foundation.walmart.com/eathealthytogether


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Community

Why Supporting the Military is Gary Sinise’s Mission

The tragic events surrounding the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks in the United States left actor Gary Sinise asking himself, “What can I do to support our military?” He found the answer in doing what he loves: entertaining.

Although not a veteran himself, Gary became a vocal supporter of American servicemen and women. He began touring with the USO across the U.S. and to military bases abroad, and eventually brought musician friends along to perform. What started as a group just playing together for fun turned into the Lt. Dan Band, named after Sinise’s memorable Vietnam War veteran character in the movie “Forrest Gump.” In the past 13 years, the band has played hundreds of shows, including a recent concert that Walmart sponsored to recognize Medal of Honor recipients.

In 2011, his personal mission to champion wounded heroes, their families and children of the fallen led him to establish the Gary Sinise Foundation. The organization is home to a variety of programs that offer support, raise awareness and provide necessary resources to wounded heroes and active-duty service families. Watch as Sinise shares more about his mission and offers advice on how anyone can support our nation’s military and their families. 

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Health & Wellness

Walmart Associate Conquers North Pole Marathon

Some people will go a long way to support charity. For Dorn Wenninger, vice president of global food sourcing for Walmart U.S., not even the North Pole is too far.

Dorn was one of 56 runners from 21 countries who participated in the 14th annual North Pole Marathon on April 9. Dubbed the “World’s Coolest Marathon,” the 26.2-mile race not only challenges endurance athletes with its snow-covered, icy terrain and bone-chilling weather, it also supports a variety of worthy causes with hundreds of thousands of dollars raised each year.

Crossing the finish line after five hours and 17 minutes, Dorn captured first place and secured his spot in an exclusive group of 428 people worldwide who have completed the marathon since 2002.

This year’s competitors ran to raise money for a variety of causes worldwide. Dorn, who has been with Walmart almost six years, serves on the boards of two nonprofit organizations: Cobblestone Farm in Northwest Arkansas and Amigos de las Americas. He will continue to raise money for Cobblestone Farm, which produces organic produce that is then donated to local food banks.

“I’m passionate about healthy eating, farming and produce,” he said.

His passion also extends to running. In January, he participated in a marathon in Trinidad and Tobago, where the temperature was 130 degrees warmer than the lowest temperature he experienced while at the North Pole.

Knowing that running on snow and ice would be different, he trained for the North Pole event on dirt and gravel trails. But the terrain wasn’t his only concern. With temperatures between -25 and -43 degrees Fahrenheit, his respiration froze and built up on his face mask. He used three different masks throughout the five-hour run and ended up with early signs of frost bite on his nose.

His North Pole adventure was supposed to last one and half days, but a crack in the runway prevented Dorn from flying out for three days. Despite the delay, he said the trip was an amazing experience.

Running is a great way to deal with stress, he said – even on 6 feet of ice floating on 14,000 feet of Arctic Ocean. It also can have a positive impact on other areas of life, from personal to business.

“Achieving the seemingly impossible helps demonstrate that almost anything is possible, even when others don’t believe it is,” he said. “Determination, focus and persistence go a long way in achieving goals.”

Dorn never imagined he’d win the North Pole race, but with that victory in hand, he now has his eye on a few other challenges just as difficult – or more so.

“It's incredible what people are capable of when they put their mind to it,” he said. “The thought of running a marathon at the North Pole sounds so extreme that it's virtually unbelievable. I welcomed the challenge of proving, to myself, that it is possible.”

Photos courtesy of North Pole Marathon.

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Opportunity

From Leading Soldiers to Leading Walmart Associates

Following in my father’s footsteps, I joined the Marines before I finished high school.

After returning home from two tours of duty in Somalia and Iraq, I found that similar to many veterans, I struggled with the transition to civilian life. Initially I thought I had only two options: police officer or fireman. I decided on becoming a patrolman, but there were a limited number of openings, and the salary would have made it difficult to support my family.

After much research, I decided to work in retail. I took my first position with Walmart not only because of the secure salary but also because Walmart seemed to be a company that offered equal opportunity to every kind of person. Just like the military, I would be able to prove my abilities and possibly be rewarded for high performance.

Several months after separating from the Marines, when I felt the desire to rejoin the military, Walmart encouraged me to return. I joined the Army National Guard and was eventually called back to Iraq to serve in Operation Iraqi Freedom. I was a lead sniper, in charge of training more than 200 Iraqi policemen and 15 Americans. I was responsible for teaching them everything from leadership to gathering intelligence in a combat environment.

My part in the deployment ended after mortar rounds landed preceding a serious firefight in which I suffered several injuries after mobilizing my men to safely return to camp. I was awarded the Bronze Star with valor for my leadership; however, my recovery took months of surgeries. Today, I’m legally blind in my left eye, and still have some memory issues from a traumatic brain injury. But through all those difficult times, my managers at Walmart were really supportive. They helped me work around my limitations and even flew me to Kansas City to receive the Sam Walton Hero Award in front of 5,000 people.

After my recovery, I learned how to translate my military background to the business world even further. It may sound very different, going from staff sergeant to running a grocery department, but leadership skills remain constant. It’s all about establishing routines, simplifying things for associates, leading them and understanding them. Because of that, I’ve been able to grow my career.

I was recently promoted to Fresh Operations Manager and lead more than 1,000 associates. I work in the field, teaching and training fresh operations in our stores and have remained committed to our troops by supporting Walmart’s initiative to hire veterans. I work with HR to help them understand the different military ranks and how that translates to jobs. In the last five years, Walmart has hired more than 100,000 veterans and we’re a stronger company because of it.

I like to stay involved in supporting veterans in any way I can. I co-founded Helping Hands for Freedom, a nonprofit that supports the families of wounded and fallen soldiers. Most soldiers and their families lack the kind of support I was fortunate to receive from Walmart, so we do everything we can.

It’s great knowing I work for a company that supports my involvement with veterans. My plan is to continue to grow within the company and move up to senior leadership on the grocery side of the business. I want to continue to move forward with my development and growth so I can continue to lead and develop associates across our company.

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Innovation

Checking Your Grocery List, and Getting it Right

People want to save money and time, so it's no wonder online grocery shopping sounds so appealing. Open your browser, click the grocery items you need, and let someone else do the shopping for you – right down to loading them in your trunk, right?

That’s exactly why Walmart will be expanding its online grocery service to nine more new markets this month, such as Columbus, Ohio; Omaha, Nebraska; and Raleigh, North Carolina. But our customers want more than just the ability to click and shop from the comfort of their own homes or workplaces. They want to know the perfect tomato – or better yet, banana or avocado (because those can be especially tricky) – finds its way into their grocery bag every time.

Before we began expanding the service to more markets, we worked tirelessly for quite some time to pilot and modify our online grocery service – and that’s because we’re committed to getting it right every time. The key to how we build a trusting bond with customers rests with our managers and, most importantly, our personal shoppers. We select only the best of the best for this critical role, and each associate undergoes rigorous training.

Selecting great produce and meat is essential. Personal shoppers not only learn the art of selecting these items by look, but also by touch and smell. For example, when a customer selects strawberries, our personal shoppers peek through each side of the carton. Similarly, finding the perfect pineapple or cantaloupe requires extra time – and we make the time. When our personal shoppers are gathering frozen and refrigerated items, they work quickly to select those items and return them to a designated, temperature-controlled holding area to ensure quality is not compromised.

But all the training in the world can’t account for everything. That’s where personal relationships matter.

Our promise to customers is that we’re not just here to gather their groceries. We learn their names.  Over time, we’ll get to know whether they prefer softer or firmer avocados, because we understand that texture makes a difference if you’re adding a slice to a salad or mashing it for guacamole. And as we get to know our customers more, we can begin to know which customers are fans of yellow bananas, and which opt for slightly green for a longer shelf life.

We’re in the business of saving our customers money so they can live better. In our eyes, taking grocery shopping off a customer’s growing to-do list, while ensuring quality and convenience every time – that’s definitely living better.

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