Opportunity

The Academy That Helped This Manager Stay One Step Ahead

Lee Griffin isn’t tough to spot, even in uniform. At 6 feet, 6 inches, he towers over his fellow associates and customers, and his signature bowties pop at his shirt collar every day.

He says he’s all leg and is a little hard to keep up with – but these days, that’s because he’s walking with a purpose.

Although he’s always had passions to pursue (he plays piano, guitar and writes his own music) he didn’t feel like he had a real career path after leaving the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, where he had been recruited for the basketball team. When he graduated, he was working at a chicken plant in Georgia and didn’t see any room to grow into his potential. That’s when his girlfriend at the time suggested he apply to Walmart.

His application was accepted and he soon began working full time as an overnight stocker, before moving through the ranks to support manager. “That’s when I started seeing clearly that there is a career here,” Lee said. “I could always see myself going further with Walmart.”

Once Lee became a support manager, he enrolled in his store’s Academy program. That’s where he learned to grown as an associate, a leader and a person. “A lot of things resonated with me in the Academy, but I think the most important thing is that now I’ve got goals to set to where I want to be,” he said.

Lee says that his 5-year-old daughter is his biggest motivator.

“I want her to look at me and be proud of what I do,” Lee said, “and at the same time I want her to do better than what I’ve done. I’m trying to do the best that I can in her eyes so that I’ll raise her expectations of herself. That’s what motivates me.”

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U.S. Manufacturing

In the News: Inside Our Open Call for American Manufacturing

Shrimp, hair gel, sweet potato cake.

Forbes sent a film crew to Walmart’s corporate office in Bentonville, Arkansas, to capture the excitement as suppliers pitched these and hundreds of other products at our annual U.S. Manufacturing Open Call event.

Forbes shared its inside look today. Take a look at what the big day is like for the people behind the products.

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Opportunity

Retired Store Manager Fashions Second Career Out of Dreams and Opportunity

Sometimes it’s not enough to follow your dreams. You also need someone else to see your potential.

My career at Walmart was a dream – so unanticipated! And that set me up to follow yet another dream. After nearly 20 years, I retired Feb. 17 as manager of supercenter #2914 in Massillon, Ohio, to start my own business as a fashion stylist – something I’ve been passionate about for years – and to spend more time with my precious family.

I have long had an interest in fashion, starting back when my mother was a seamstress and would create her own designs as I was growing up. Most of my wardrobe was handmade by her! I always loved how wearing something special made me feel. Working at Walmart, particularly with women, rekindled a passion in me to witness the impact of dressing well. Increased confidence, better communication, direct eye contact – we all know how that feels. Feeling positive about ourselves can be transformational.

My retail career had simple beginnings in 1997, when I was a stay-at-home mom with five small children in a single-income family. That August I was looking to get a little extra money for Christmas and applied for the first clock-in-and-out job of my life. Walmart hired me as a temporary associate despite my having dropped out of college to start a family and having zero experience in retail. I never would have dreamed I’d take a job stocking store shelves overnight and end up managing 500 people.

This company backed me every step of the way, seeing and believing in a potential I didn't recognize. One of my first store managers took a significant interest in challenging and pushing me to see opportunities that existed. It taught me how important the human touch can be.

I remember one young man who was doing a really good job as an hourly supervisor at my store. Not long after we talked about his potential, he put his job in jeopardy by clocking in late on multiple days. Instead of giving up on him, his direct supervisor asked him what was going on. He shared that his car had broken down, and with no other transportation he’d had to walk the four miles to and from the store. After hearing this, I bought him a bicycle to help put him back on the right track. He ended up going into a management program and is doing really well today.

As for me, my story has come full circle. Walmart not only gave me the acumen and process to run my own business, it also gave my husband and me the financial security to start this second phase of our lives. My baby was in kindergarten when I started my career, and now all my children are grown and college-educated. Freedom in my schedule allows me to be a stay-at-home grandma to five grandchildren.

Having been at the Massillon supercenter for the last four years, it was bittersweet to turn over my keys and the responsibility. But, I’m excited to continue being a cheerleader from the outside. The people I hired are going to go even further than I did with the belief they can have limitless careers.

Photos courtesy of Massillon Independent.

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Innovation

How Easy Reorder is Making Shopping Even … Easier

Peanut butter beats jelly. Water beats soda. Tortilla chips beat potato chips. These are just a few of the things revealed to us by our new Easy Reorder feature.

What is Easy Reorder? Instead of telling you, let me try and show you. Imagine this … last week you purchased diapers while at your local store. Then you realized you forgot a few things. So, you logged onto Walmart.com and purchased wipes as well as some cleaning supplies and paper towels.

The next time you open the Walmart app, you may notice something different. The site remembers the Walmart.com items you purchased, but also the diapers you bought in your local store – including the brand and size.

Easy Reorder, which is available now on desktops and our mobile app, makes it … well, easy for you to reorder items that you previously purchased at Walmart. Here’s the cool part: We’re integrating both in-store and online purchases to provide you with a single spot to view (and repurchase) the items that you buy most frequently – items like dog food, cereal, shampoo and diapers.

Let me share a little bit more on why we’re doing this. I’ll use myself as an example. I have 151 different items on my Easy Reorder list. I challenge you to go online and try and find 100 individual products to build a list. You’ll find it takes a really long time. Now, you can simply go into a Walmart store, buy the things you need and then, when you come home, everything will be neatly organized on Walmart.com. For me, that means that I get to save a ton of time when I need to repurchase the items I’m looking for. Trust me, with two kids at home, I have to replenish the snack cupboard a lot. Easy Reorder is a game changer.

I’m not the only one who loves this feature. Our customers love it as well, and we’re seeing it in our results – Easy Reorder contributed to the growth we saw in the first quarter.

For fun, I thought I’d share some of the top items on customers’ reorder lists:

Easy Reorder is part of our team’s laser focus on helping customers save both money and time by leveraging our more than 4,700 stores and Walmart.com.

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Community

Why This Associate Wants You to Start With #HelloMyNameIs

“Hello, my name is….” It’s a phrase made up of only four words.

It takes very little time to say – it’s an easy way to begin a conversation. Yet, when people say these words, they can have such a big impact.

My late wife, Kate, started the #HelloMyNameIs campaign in 2013 while living with terminal cancer. As a medic herself, she had become frustrated with nurses and doctors who never introduced themselves to her before providing medical care.

Kate had already been speaking to hospitals and conferences about her experience as both a medical provider and a patient, but through the campaign she hoped to share some key values that resonate beyond people working in healthcare: communication, small acts of kindness, putting the patient at the center of every decision and seeing each person as an individual.

Kate was one of the most determined, resilient people I have ever known. I firmly believe that through adversity, comes legacy. July 23 is International “Hello My Name Is” Day – both the anniversary of Kate’s passing and what would have been our 12th wedding anniversary. We invite everyone – from people to corporations – to join us in celebrating Kate’s legacy by introducing yourself and using #HelloMyNameIs.

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