Life

Mom Knows Best

This is an excerpt from the May 2014 edition of Parade Magazine, by Alison Gwinn and Lan Truong.

If you want a window into American families today, ask a mom to describe her life. This is what you’ll hear: “Nonstop.” “Overwhelming.” “Chaos.” But you’ll also hear this: “Grateful.” “Blessed.” “Fulfilled.” To mark the 100th anniversary of Mother’s Day, in partnership with the Walmart Moms Research Project*, Parade Magazine conducted in-person interviews and polled 1,000 moms to understand what matters most to them in 2014.

Here are a few highlights:

Moms Have a Lot on Their Plates
47% help their kids with their homework every night

They Keep Their Family Close
78% eat dinner together with their kids most nights every week

They Are Confident That They’re Doing a Good Job
38% consider themselves a better mom than their own mothers

Read more at Parade.com and hear directly from moms on whether they’re saving for their kids’ college education, how they feel about the effects of the recession…and what they wish they had done differently. Get the full story.

* The Walmart Moms Research Project, which began in 2009, sheds light on a critical group of swing voters (defined as women with a child under 18 at home, who have shopped at Walmart at least once in the past month). Learn more at Parade.com

Be the first to comment on this article

Opportunity

Seeing Through my Blindness to a Future at Walmart

That’s a line from one of my poems – I’ve been writing inspirational poetry most of my life. I’ve tried to live by the truth in those words ever since I was a young child who loved to ride bikes and had dreams of growing up to be a football player.

When I was five years old, I was confronted with a very real and dangerous enemy – a brain tumor that was pressing on my optic nerve. Doctors successfully removed the tumor – likely saving my life – however, when I woke it was to a world of blindness.

That tumor might have gotten to my sight but it didn’t get my spirit, and it hasn’t stopped me from dreaming. I still get to ride bikes – I live out in the country where I can ride freely – and I shifted from a dream of football to the reality of playing baseball.

Beep baseball, that is.

In beep baseball we use a ball that beeps so you know where to swing and where to track to catch. The game also has beeping bases so you know where to run and throw. I play outfield, and I’m pretty good, and so is my team, the Tyler Tigers. In fact, we’ve traveled to places like Georgia and Minnesota for the beep baseball championships.

John Geeter grabs a gallon of milk from a shelf in a Walmart dairy department back room

Today I’m working on a new dream – to grow in my career at Walmart. About 18 months ago I started in a training program with Goodwill that helped me develop key retail skills. The training included an on-the-job assignment in the produce department at my local Walmart store in Tyler, Texas.

After proving myself in the Goodwill program, I got an interview with Walmart, and they hired me on as a permanent associate – I celebrated my one-year anniversary in February – and now I work in the dairy department. I used Braille labels on signs when I first started at Walmart so I’d know where everything was supposed to go; however, I’ve learned my department so well I don’t even need the Braille signage anymore. If a customer asks me where to find the butter or milk, I can take her right to it.

John Geeter is wearing a Walmart navy vest and is smiling in front of the dairy department

I like working for Walmart – they saw how hard I worked while in the Goodwill program and they worked with me to find a place where I could fit. The thing I like most is working around other people and helping my fellow associates get acclimated to working with a person with a disability. The next step for me is to work with department managers and other leaders in my store to determine what I need to learn in order to pursue growth opportunities with Walmart.

I tell everybody that I look at each day as a challenge. I’m ready to take that challenge head on because I want more for myself and those who come behind me – I want to leave a legacy that other people with disabilities can follow.

Be the first to comment on this article

Life

7 Tips to Save on Vacations through Sam’s Club Travel

If you have the winter blues and are daydreaming of sunny skies, spend your snow day making those dreams a reality by planning a spring break or summer getaway with Sam’s Club Travel

Sam’s Club has teamed up with Tourico Holidays to create an online travel-booking portal that offers world-class selection, service, and savings to Sam’s Club members. Booking with us comes with great perks, such as a meal upgrade or cabin upgrade on a cruise. In fact, hotel savings can range from 15% to 50% off, and you can save up to 15% off cruises. 

Ready to escape the arctic freeze and book a trip? Check out these money-saving and timesaving tips from our travel team:

1. Time Bookings Right

Airlines typically come out with their sales on Tuesdays, so book flights then. With more than 150 airlines offered through Sam’s Club Travel, it’s easy to find your favorite. For cruises, costs vary greatly for people booking very early or very late; prices are most consistently low between 90 and 30 days before the ship’s intended departure.

2. Book Attractions Early

Many have long lines and some (like Alcatraz in San Francisco and hot Broadway shows) sell out early each day. Before you leave home, check out our 6,000 fun attractions (in more than 800 destinations) and buy tickets from us ahead of time.

3. Get a Better Room for Less

On Sam’s Club Travel, look for hotel offerings marked “Best Value” to ensure you’re getting the most for your hard-earned vacation dollars. There are more than 500 such hotels across 1,000 destinations on our site, and they include budget, luxury, and brand-name selections.

Sam's Club Travel


4. Start with a Tour

A great way to get to know a big city is with a bus tour. This allows you to see many hot spots and note what you want to explore later. Another inexpensive option is a walking tour led by a local guide, who can offer tips on where to eat and what to see. Sam’s Club Travel offers tours in all major cities.

5. Learn from Industry Insiders

You may know that people often pay more to travel to a destination during its high season. Problem is, you may not know when, exactly, that is. If you’re not wedded to traveling during a particular week, call a Sam’s Club Travel representative and ask which days of the year will cost you the least.

6. Earn Cash on Charges

Before you travel, consider applying for the 5-3-1 Sam’s Club Mastercard. This card offers cash back: 5% on fuel, 3% on dining and travel, and 1% on all other purchases (including souvenirs!)—up to $5,000 annually. It also uses new chip technology that makes it tougher for criminals to steal your credit card information.

7. Get the Inside Scoop

Love to read other travelers’ experiences? You’ll find TripAdvisor reviews right on the Sam’s Club Travel website. This saves you time: no more searching on other websites for valuable feedback and tips.

By the Numbers: Sam’s Club Travel

A quick look at the perks you’ll find on SamsClub.com/Travel:

  • 15% - 50% off hotel rooms
  • Up to 15% off cruises
  • Up to 25% off tours, attractions, activities and transfers
  • Up to 10% off rental cars

Editor’s Note: This article originally appeared in and was adapted from Strive, the magazine for Sam’s Club associates. 

Want to learn how to become a member at Sam’s Club? Visit SamsClub.com

Be the first to comment on this article

Community

Among the Essentials, a Delivery of Hope

When Hurricane Katrina made landfall in August 2005, David Simmons’ first thought wasn’t the minor damage to his home in Mississippi. It was calling the Walmart dispatch station to see how he could help through his job as a truck driver.

He was sure there was plenty of emergency freight that had to be delivered, but that wasn’t a request he was met with on the other end of the line. The operator instead asked how his family fared in the storm, and told him to stay home and take care of his property as there were drivers coming from all over to assist with the recovery.

Later, he did get a chance to help – hauling donated merchandise for the Salvation Army – and says that it remains to this day one of the most fulfilling moments of his driving career.

“From food, clothing and water to even roofing materials, it was all needed and appreciated by the residents of the Gulf Coast,” David said.

Rickey Oliver, too, remembers Katrina as a moment he was proud to work for Walmart. One of the drivers who participated in a convoy of trucks that waited to enter one of the most heavily damaged areas of New Orleans, Rickey thought for a moment that the abandoned-looking area around him was actually empty. 

A man proudly holds a 2005 image of Walmart trucks waiting to enter affected areas of the Gulf Coast after Hurricane Katrina

“To my amazement, like in the movie Field of Dreams they came, walking in from every street, every corner, out of buildings I thought for sure no one would be in. All hungry and thirsty and desperate for help, and we … were the help,” Rickey said. “I don’t think a person can truly express the feeling or the honor one receives in doing this kind of thing.”

Gary Mars, another Walmart driver who was part of that same convoy, feels the same way. Carrying water, generators, and food – plus ice, important during hot August weather in Louisiana – was a critical role to fill.

“I remember the sense of pride I felt as we convoyed into New Orleans and surrounding cities, as nearly every vehicle we met was waving at us as we passed, and several had makeshift signs saying, ‘Thank you, Walmart,’” Gary said. “I was relatively new to Walmart, but I knew at that point that this was a place to permanently call home. It’s amazing to me just how quick lives can change, just in a moment. It’s very humbling.” 

Be the first to comment on this article

Community

One Nurse, 16 Infants, and a Storm’s Ultimate Test

Medea Gabriel is not a hero, she insists.

During Hurricane Katrina, there were many others she believes are equally deserving of that title. Her fellow medical staff at New Orleans Memorial Medical Center who worked while separated from their families. Her best friend, Monique, who took Medea’s ailing mother to evacuate on her own. Also, the strangers she remembers driving their personal boats to pick up patients and staff from the hospital and navigate them to dry land.

But as a nurse in the neonatal intensive care unit, Medea helped wrap up 16 babies and move them to shelter through a hole in the wall that led to a truck bed. The truck bed was to take them to a helicopter and then, safety, but once Medea passed each infant through the wall, she had no idea if outside realities would let that happen.

Today, she knows that nearly all of those babies somehow survived on the way to their destination, Baton Rouge Women’s Hospital. While one of them did pass away, she doesn’t know how or when, because that hospital has since closed. She recently got a Facebook message from one of the mothers who wanted to thank her for what she did that day.

“It was surreal to know how much I impacted her life and that she remembered me,” Medea said. “Just knowing that these kids are now 10 years old lets me go on.”

Photo shows the inside of a neonatal intensive care unit

When Medea transported those infants that day, she says she was simply doing her job. Once the job was complete, she turned her full attention toward her mother, whom she sent with her best friend to get on a boat to safety. She had to pack up her mother’s medicine, waterproof her medical records and dosage instructions and staple them to the inside of her mother’s clothes so they didn’t get lost. She then sent her two loved ones off to stay with a college roommate whom she believed in her heart would take them in, but she didn’t know for sure. It was the second big moment that day where she had to simply act.

Thankfully, two days later – after Medea herself had to leave the hospital not knowing her next resting place – she found out that her mother was, in fact, alive.

While many things have changed for Medea since then, like a new job and also a new husband, she has returned home to New Orleans and works with pediatric patients once again, this time doing HIV research.

“I’m in a totally different place than I was before Katrina,” she said. “I’ve found peace and joy in this recovery.”

Editor’s Note: You can hear more of Medea’s story in a four-part podcast created by Good360, a disaster relief organization that works to improve the way communities can connect with much-needed supplies.    

Be the first to comment on this article