Health & Wellness

Making Organic Foods a Reality For All

We spend a lot of time talking to our customers. They tell us that one of the challenges they face is feeding their families on a budget. And when it comes to purchasing organic options, cost is often one of the biggest barriers. At the same time, there’s a shift happening at the dinner table. Interest in food that is organic is growing.

At Walmart, our perspective on this consumer demand is simple: we don’t think that people who want to eat organic should have to pay more for their food. That’s why we’re proud to announce the launch of Wild Oats, a line of organic foods to be sold at Walmart stores, without the price premium typically associated with these products.

Beginning this month, we’re rolling out approximately 100 different items – foods like organic pasta sauce, spices, chicken broth, canned beans, salsa and other grocery products.  With the introduction of Wild Oats, we estimate customers who purchase organic items at Walmart can save nearly 25% or more on their grocery bill when compared to other organic products on our shelves.*

While you may not think of Walmart as a destination for organic groceries, we are.  We offer more than 1,600 organic grocery items including produce, dairy products like milk and yogurt, and national branded packaged goods. Organic food is also becoming more popular among our customers. Internal research found that 91% of our shoppers would purchase affordable organic products in our stores.

This is why we're using our scale to deliver quality, organic groceries to our customers for less. When we do this, it’s a win, win, win -- for our customers, our suppliers and our company. Our customers can trust that they will save money at Walmart, our suppliers can count on us for the demand and we are able to offer innovative new products. 

This isn’t about telling our customers what to eat, nor is it an endorsement of certain foods. It’s about leveraging our scale to provide access to the choices that currently elude too many families in our country. It’s just one more way we’re helping our customers save money so they can live better. 

Editor’s Note:  Savings claim is based on item price comparisons (per ounce) of 26 nationally branded organic products available at Walmart stores. Research was conducted in April 2014. 



2 Dreams, 2 Degrees, and 1 Unconventional Path

Like most moms, Lisa Moore has always bent over backward to put her son Joseph “Joey” Moore in a position to make his dreams come true. But there was one such dream that weighed especially heavy on her.

“I’ll never forget the day Joey came to me and said, ‘Mom, I’m going to go to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,’” Lisa said. “He was only 11 years old when he told me, but his mind was made up. I wanted to help make it happen but, as a single mother, I honestly didn't know where the money was going to come from.”

When Joey neared the end of high school, Lisa’s manager at the Walmart store in Mooresville, N.C. where she worked turned her onto the Associate and Dependent Scholarship Programs offered by the Walmart Foundation. Not only could associates like Lisa apply for scholarship assistance, but so could their high school senior dependents.

That was 2007.  Joey applied for and received a scholarship, and graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  And he’s used his chemistry degree to springboard into a successful career with Henkel Corporation.

But that isn't where the story ends with the Moore family.

“It wasn’t long before Joey started telling me I could do the same thing – that it's never too late to go to college,” said Lisa, 52. “A light came on inside me.”

Already a pastor at Scott’s Chapel United Methodist Church in Statesville, N.C., Lisa recently decided to apply to the Associate Scholarship Program to help finance her enrollment at Hood Theological Seminary School. She, like her son, was awarded a scholarship and is on track to graduate in 2018 with her Masters of Divinity degree. At that point, she plans to focus her efforts full time on the church, pursuing her dream of becoming an elder and possibly even a chaplain.

And she has quite the cheering section behind her.

“There are so many people lifting me up and cheering me on,” Lisa said. That’s why I’ve been with Walmart for 16 years. My job at Walmart has helped put a roof over my head and raise my son, and now it has [helped to support] both of our college educations.

“When I enrolled in seminary, Walmart allowed me to cut back some of my hours to concentrate on school,” she said. “Walmart has always been flexible with my schedule, no matter what was happening in my life and I’m so thankful for that. I’m the biggest cheerleader for this company, not just because of the scholarship program, but because of how it has looked out for me and my family.”

For more than three decades, the Walmart Foundation has made resources available to help U.S. associates and their high school senior dependents fulfill their educational goals through scholarships. More information is available here. 


Health & Wellness

One Community’s Track to a Healthier Lifestyle

Just shy of 198,000. That’s how many square feet the Walmart store I manage in Sanford, Maine covers. But, at this location, I – and the several residents who frequent it at the crack of dawn during the late fall and winter months with gym shoes on – tend to calculate things differently.

Walmart prides itself on being more than a store that offers customers everyday low prices on goods and services. We seek out opportunities to connect with the community on a larger level. One such opportunity here in Sanford has been to open our facility to those looking for a safe environment to get their morning walk in once the temperatures start dropping and the snow starts flying.

There are quite a few folks who know the perimeter of our store – from toys to electronics to dairy and through produce – like the back of their hands. They know a lap is exactly ¼ mile, so four times around equals 1 mile. And, for many, that’s enough to continue working toward a healthier lifestyle.

It all began in early 2014, when Partners for Healthier Communities, a community coalition working to improve the health and well-being of residents in York County, approached us with the idea. We make our store available and promote it with in-store signage. PHC promotes it externally and supplies free pedometers to those who participate.

We offer the option year-round, but during the dead of winter is when it really picks up. We’ll have anywhere from 8 to 20 people doing laps around the store bright and early. When you really step back to think about it, it's a no-brainer. This is a wonderful opportunity for us to contribute something we have – space. There are people who have been walking their entire lives to keep fit. Others are trying to make a positive change or are recovering from surgery. Whatever the case, it’s something we’re going to continue to support.

I love walking in the door in the morning and seeing people doing laps. Once in a while, they even give a tip or two about how to improve our store. That’s a tradeoff I’ll take any day.    

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Writing a Wish List, and Stumbling Upon a Career

Eleven years ago, Jean Mullins didn’t have just one job, or two jobs – she worked as many as four at a time. From babysitting to mowing yards, cleaning houses and painting, she did anything she could to support her children. For fun, she’d take them to Walmart, where they’d make wish lists of the things they wanted, and after spending so much time there, she decided to apply for a job.

She got that job, and today, it’s her only one. A career may not have been on Jean’s wish list, but it’s what she quickly built. Watch how she says filling out that application changed her life for the better.

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The Farm That Grows Clean Energy

Working for Pattern Energy, I have a front row seat in the global push to renewable energy.

My rush comes when I see a new wind farm being erected on the horizon, because I know that translates into improved air quality, reduced greenhouse gas emissions, preservation of natural resources – even affordable long-term energy pricing.

But projects with that kind of impact don't happen without significant investment, and oftentimes, that requires big players stepping to the table. That’s why Logan’s Gap, a newly constructed, 87-turbine wind farm in Comanche County, Texas, has my adrenaline pumping. Logan’s Gap represents a major commitment that probably wouldn't be here without Walmart’s financial backing. Because Walmart set such a bold aspirational goal – to be powered 100% by renewable energy – and has stable credit, financing for such a project was made possible. And the benefits are huge.

Walmart signed a 10-year power purchase agreement to acquire 58% of the expected output from the Logan’s Gap wind project. That investment alone will supply more than 25% of Walmart’s electricity needs in deregulated areas of Texas, serving more than 380 Walmart stores, Sam’s Clubs and distribution centers. It also represents nearly 18% of the U.S. portion of the retailer’s goal to produce or procure 7 billion kilowatt hours of renewable energy by 2020.

In the end, it’s smart business. Walmart and other organizations that invest in wind, solar and other renewable energy resources lock in affordable energy costs for multiple years. But, in doing so, they’re also decarbonizing themselves. They're being great environmental stewards, and every one of us reap the benefits.

A big part of my job is contemplating where we’ll be four to five years from now in terms of energy. What will the energy mix be – from wind to solar to a combination of the two? What will the price structure look like?

We’re relentless in our commitment to forecasting wind activity, because that’s what helps determine return on investment. At Pattern Energy, we have six full-time meteorologists on staff, crunching enormous amounts atmospheric data around the world. They’ve helped us pinpoint the best locations – Logan’s Gap included – to construct wind farms in the U.S., Puerto Rico, Canada and Chile.

As far as the science of forecasting has come in recent years, so has the technology associated with the wind turbines themselves. I remember the days when a wind turbine height of 40 meters was huge. Today, 100 meters is pretty much standard. For every meter we’re able to go higher and wider, we create the opportunity to capture more clean energy.

But it’s not always as easy as pinpointing an optimal location and putting technology to work. A lot of areas around the world are highly regulated. In Texas, for example, there’s a lot of open land, so there are typically fewer hurdles. In more densely populated areas of the East Coast, however, you have to take into account how details such as noise level and views will be impacted. It's critical to find the right balance.

Despite these and other hurdles that sometimes exist, we’re starting to see an increase in interest from global players, like Walmart. They're demonstrating that it's possible to run a very successful business while also being good environmental citizens. They're investing in the infrastructure necessary to harness renewable energy because it's the right thing to do for the future. And that’s a fantastic message to send to the rest of the world.    

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