Sustainability

Feeding the World Demands Change from Farm to Fork

Last weekend, in the wake of one of the longest, coldest winters in recent memory, my family and I walked in the spring sunshine, past stands of oaks and blossoming redbuds, along the winding trails of Crystal Bridges.  We love our new Ozarks home, and have been reveling in the signs of spring all around us. We are excited to celebrate Earth Day in “the Natural State” of Arkansas.

Here at Walmart, we’ve been marking Earth Day with the release of our Global Responsibility Report and the renewal of our commitment to sustainability. While we are proud of our progress in energy, waste, and product chains, we have a long way to go.  

Nowhere is this more the case than in the food chain.  In the next 30 years, the world population will approach 9 billion, putting further stress on already-strained natural capital.  As the world’s largest grocer, we are concerned with one of the greatest challenges of our time: how to help provide people on every continent with food that is safe, affordable, and sustainable for people and planet.

healthier food stock image


No one can solve this alone.  Progress will require collaborative problem solving among people all along the food chain – from farmers and fishers to transporters, development agencies, manufacturers, scientists, activists, regulators, retailers and consumers.  It’s why, for example, Walmart recently joined USAID’s groundbreaking Global Development Lab, along with a number of other organizations, to develop innovative solutions to development challenges such as this.

Will you join Walmart and so many others in creating a more sustainable food chain? Here are just a few of the ways we are trying to make a difference, from field (and ocean) to fork:

Resilient sourcing: We’re working with farmers to adopt innovative agriculture practices that preserve the environment and are fair to the people who use them. For example, we are working with partners on technologies to reduce fertilizer and pesticide use, and to conserve water; and we recently joined the Coalition of Immokalee Workers (CIW) Fair Food Program – an initiative to improve farmworkers’ working conditions and wages.

Waste reduction: We’re addressing food waste all along the chain - for example, by gleaning fallen produce from the ground, and making use of an entire crop.  We cull fresh food from our stores before it goes bad, so that instead of becoming waste sent to landfill, it gets sent to hunger relief organizations and then on to people who need it most.  

Food safety: Walmart was the first U.S. grocer to require suppliers of food products such as produce, meat, fish, poultry and ready-to-eat foods to have their factories certified against one of the internationally recognized Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI) standards. We are bringing our food safety approaches to our operations around the world, including not only North America, but in many countries across Africa, Latin America, and Asia.

Food security and access: Improving access to affordable food is a core part of our business strategy. It’s why we’re saving customers more than $1 billion each year on fresh produce and opening stores in food deserts. Earlier this month, we announced the rollout of affordable organic foods under the Wild Oats label.  And for years, we’ve worked with food banks to provide more links from our stores and suppliers, as well as the infrastructure to support a permanent cold chain – all in an effort to route millions of pounds of food to communities that need it most.

Making healthy easy: Of course, it’s not just about feeding the world – it’s about feeding families well. So we’re taking the homework out of healthy shopping, working with suppliers to reduce sugars and sodium and remove trans fats in everyday foods, while making the more nutritious choices easier to spot with our Great For You icon in stores. We’re providing tips and tools for how to turn these foods into simple, healthy and delicious meals, and working with valuable partners to educate families on cooking skills and nutrition.

We are committed to using our strengths – our market access, investment dollars, technological expertise and scale – to help others.  Please join us; bring your unique strengths to the table, and work with us, to set the table for everyone. 

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Business

Introducing a Refreshed Look for the Walmart Blog

If you frequent this blog, you may have noticed that the look has changed a bit. Not only that, but it has a new name, too – Walmart Today. What hasn’t changed is our purpose: bringing you real stories about our customers, associates and the thousands of communities around the globe that we call home.

We’ve simply made these stories easier to discover, and complemented them with bigger, more seamlessly integrated pictures and video. We hope you like the new design, as we spent months researching and thinking through the best way to structure it for our readers.

Ultimately, our new name and new look represent not only a destination for new and fresh stories from the world’s largest retailer, but also a source for understanding how what’s happening today is shaping Walmart’s future.

Those changes aren’t limited to this blog. We’ve also taken our new approach over to Twitter, where you’ll find that we’re communicating through a handle of the same name.

Thanks for reading, and we’re excited to have a refreshed place to continue doing what we love: telling real stories you may not have heard, and bringing to light the voices that make us Walmart Today.

Let us know what you think! Leave a comment below, or join the conversation on Twitter.    

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Sustainability

Helping Customers Know More About How Food is Raised

At Walmart, we view food sustainability as a commitment to help the world feed a quickly-growing population through the four-pillar approach of making food more affordable, more accessible, healthier, and more safe and transparent.

The “safe and transparent” component involves promoting human rights and animal welfare among suppliers and across food chains. It means putting customers in charge of their food choices, and ensuring they have clear, accurate information about food ingredients and production methods.

Our customers have told us that they want to know more about where their food comes from, and how it was sourced. Today, we are announcing updated positions regarding animal welfare and the responsible use of antibiotics in farm animals. You can view them here.

We view these positions as a positive step forward for our company, and for the food industry overall. Yet it is ultimately our suppliers who are leading on safety and transparency. As a retailer that sells products but does not produce them, we can use our strengths to influence change across our supply chain. The most impactful change, however, happens through partnerships.

Sustainability is an ongoing journey for our company, and full food transparency will not happen overnight. It will come through long-term innovation, hard work, and partnership.

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Heritage

6 Ways to See the World’s Largest Retailer in the World’s Largest Museum

The beginning of July is always a great time to reflect back on Walmart history. After all, it was July 2, 1962, when Sam Walton opened his very first Walmart discount store in Rogers, Arkansas.

This year, the Smithsonian has a special birthday present for Walmart: Inclusion in the American Enterprise exhibit at the National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C. Open July 1, the exhibition “chronicles the tumultuous interaction of capitalism and democracy that resulted in the continual remaking of American business – and American life.”    

The exhibition is an 8,000-square-foot space “focused on the role of business and innovation from the mid-1700s to the present.”  So if you’re heading to our nation’s capital this summer, take a look at where our country’s curators see Walmart’s place in American history.

Photo of the entrance to the Smithsonian Exhibition featuring Sam Walton and Walmart

Before you visit, here are a few things to know:

1.     Sam’s Walton’s Cap
This iconic piece of headgear is now on display in the Smithsonian. According to Peter Liebhold, Chair and Curator, Division of Work and Industry, if an artifact is in the Smithsonian archives, it’s officially in America’s collective memory. Of the more than 3 million artifacts in the archives, only about 1% are ever on display at one time. Sam’s cap is part of that 1%.

One other identical cap that’s been confirmed to have been worn by Sam in his final days is located in his office, on display at The Walmart Museum. Rob Walton donned it at Walmart’s shareholders meeting last month.

2.     Photo of Sam
The photo of Sam Walton that accompanies the display of Sam’s trucker ball cap is one that had been selected by associates in a Walmart World poll to be their favorite. While in the photo he’s not wearing the hat that’s on display, it was selected because of the disarming warmth the photo exudes.

Photo of Sam Walton on display at Smithsonian Exhibit

3.     Rosalind Brewer, “Game Changer”
Also part of the American Enterprise exhibit is a video of Sam’s Club CEO Rosalind Brewer. In this particular display, visitors select from a gallery of business leaders that the Smithsonian’s curators deem “Game Changers.” For good reason, Roz Brewer is included in the gallery, having been recognized repeatedly as one of the world’s most influential businesspersons.

Ros Brewer image featured at Smithsonian exhibit

4.     Valeda Snyder
Walmart’s very first 50-year associate is featured in a timeline along with other retail and industry employees out there on the front lines. Sadly, Valeda passed away in 2012 in her hometown of Lebanon, Missouri, before her inclusion in the Smithsonian.

Former CEO Mike Duke on stage with 50-year associate Valeda Snyder

5.     Save money. Live better.
In its section on marketing and advertising, the American Enterprise exhibit includes the best-known and most important taglines and slogans in the history of the industry. Of all of them, SMLB stands out because of its simplicity and its origin: Sam Walton.

"Save Money. Live Better" slogan on display at the Smithsonian

6.     Walmart Organic Produce
In the “Green Business” section of the exhibit, a colorful and vibrant photo of organic produce is on display as part of the story of the greening of American grocery.

Photo of Walmart Organic Produce at Smithsonian Exhibit

Can’t make it this summer? No worries. American Enterprise is a permanent exhibition set to be open to the public for at least the next 20 years.     

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U.S. Manufacturing

With This Ring, We Grew Our Business

Just one year ago, having all hands on deck for us meant 12 employees. But between then and now, something exciting gave our jewelry manufacturing work a boost.

Today, we often find ourselves bringing on 10 to 15 additional temporary employees just to keep pace with demand. We’re working through details to build a new, larger facility near Salt Lake City, because we're bursting at the seams working to fill orders. By the end of this year alone, we’ll be hiring up to 35 new full-time employees.

A close up image of a hand wearing the Luxurien camo ring

Luxurien has long been recognized as one of the premier suppliers of contemporary metal wedding bands in the U.S. But a few years back, we recognized a growing demand for something unique: high-quality jewelry with camouflage inlays, so we committed to filling that gap. We signed license agreements with Mossy Oak & Realtree, two of the most popular camouflage brands in the world, and began to make and distribute camouflage rings.

While that set the stage for bigger and better things, the real game-changing moment was set in motion when Walmart began promoting its 2014 Open Call for products that support American jobs. Luxurien was one of very few jewelry manufacturers based right here in the U.S. – and we knew we had something to offer. So we submitted our application to see if they’d meet with us, and it's been nothing short of a snowball effect ever since.

We found ourselves face-to-face with Walmart buyers, pitching our contemporary metal bands, camouflage rings and exotic wood jewelry. Within weeks, we were on our way to San Bruno, Calif., where Walmart.com committed to selling about 150 of our products online. The response from customers has been so positive that our online deal with Walmart recently expanded to include the sale of our rings in more than 600 of its U.S. stores.

A woman smiles big behind a table filled with shipping papers for Luxurien wedding bands

It’s a pretty big undertaking – particularly for a small business like ours. But the way Walmart committed to walking side-by-side with us from day one has been just as valuable as the orders it has placed. The buyers have been there to make suggestions and inject ideas. We’ve added efficiencies that simply weren’t there before, our margins have gone up considerably, and we’ve been able to raise wages for our employees. All this has, without a doubt, contributed to making us a stronger company for the long term.

This was undoubtedly what Walmart had in mind when, in January 2013, it pledged to purchase an additional $250 billion in products that support American jobs over 10 years. And Luxurien is proud to be part of this growing success story. 

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