Sustainability

Changes in plastic packaging help put a lid on GHGs

By  Leon Hall May 22, 2012

National blueberry month

The uses for plastic are many. And often, so are the questions about recycling it.

There are seven different codes that indicate the resin content of post-consumer plastics, which determines whether it is collected for recycling in a particular locality.

Walmart GRR Cover

Last year, a Walmart Canada team identified not only a way to make the process easier for everyone – but also a way to reduce the 5.85 billion pounds of plastic being added to landfills across North America annually, according to the National Association for PET Container Resources. That’s the equivalent of 3.8 million tons of greenhouse gas.

Traditionally, thermoform – the plastic clamshell packaging used for berries, mixed salads, toys and even some electronics – was made with a variety of plastics. While all types protect the product, recyclers have had a difficult time differentiating between the recycle-friendly PET plastic and other forms, such as PVC, which contaminate the recycling stream. And consumers can have an even tougher time determining what plastics they should and should not toss into their recycling bins.


From the Global Responsibility Report

Through the work of a specially designed committee, Walmart Canada eliminated the PVC from our thermoform packaging. Our team then partnered with the Retail Council of Canada, including our country’s top grocery chains, to remove obstacles preventing the recycling of PET thermoform. Ultimately, these efforts will help clean up the Canadian recycling stream, encourage broader recycling of postconsumer thermoform packaging material, and increase the availability of recycled PET, resulting in a reduction in greenhouse gas, when compared to packaging made from virgin – aka new – PET resin.

While each market has its own unique challenges and circumstances, we are actively researching ways to implement this program in other areas. By leveraging our size and scale, we can influence positive change not just in our own supply chain, but for others, too.

Read more from Leon Hall

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@WalmartGreen

Perfect read for #EarthDay: Our milestones in advancing economic opportunity, sustainability and local communities. http://t.co/MrSgnAXcCO

By Walmart Green

6:25pm April 22, 2015

Going green means different things in different parts of the world. David Cheesewright explains our efforts: http://t.co/OekG87CLIJ

By Walmart Green

9:25am April 04, 2015

@StdntOfSocMed We capture all impacts on Walmart and society in our GRR. Renewable energy is a great example: http://t.co/tcvMMMjmZf

By Walmart Green

4:20pm March 25, 2015